Getting back on the road

sdibbers

Well-Known Member
There’s always something to fettle on Beryl. My wife maintains that I look forward to the next suspect noise and can’t wait to order parts and have the car apart. She may think that, but I couldn’t possibly comment, to paraphrase the BBC House of cards.

We did a 230 mile round trip with some classic friends last weekend. While driving I could hear a deep whine on long left hand bends on the right hand side. So, as mentioned above, Monday comes and I ordered a new front wheel bearing kit from Mark Gray. The kit is handy as it has both bearing sets plus the grease seal and a new split pin.

I got home this morning from Cars and Coffee. The hub was pretty hot, 90°f vs 60°f on the left hub, another pointer to a bad bearing. I pulled the wheel, brake caliper and hub.
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The large inner bearing race has two notches behind it cast into the hub. I was able to drift it out with a screwdriver and lump hammer. The outer small race was another matter. There’s very little to get a purchase on to drift it out. Even with a spacer to use with a press. So after a 20 minute session trying lots of options I got the Dremel die grinder out with a small slitting disc. With that I carefully put two slots roughly opposite each other in the race. Then using the screwdriver and lump hammer I was able to shatter the race at two points and get it out. Result!
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I used the press to get the small race in but the large one is more recessed and I didn’t have a drift big enough. So I took the old large race and ground off some metal off the outside with the angle grinder. Once I had that it was a doddle. A quick job with a hammer and drift put the seal in and all was good.

Putting it back together with plenty of grease and a new pin I went for a test drive. She sounded okay but there was some noise at sub 10mph speeds. I whipped off the wheel and backed of the nut a little. I hadn’t giving the bearings enough runout. Now it’s at 0.004” and she’s quieter than I’ve know the car. It’s amazing how you don’t realize how noisy something is until it’s gone.
 

sdibbers

Well-Known Member
Next time, if you have access to a welder, run a bead around the inside of the race, and when it cools, it will shrink ever so slightly and allow you to remove it easily.
Good to know. Although the problem wasn’t it was stuck, it was more that there was no way to get a purchase on it to remove it. This method wasn’t too bad to be honest.
 
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Demetris

Well-Known Member
Next time, if you have access to a welder, run a bead around the inside of the race, and when it cools, it will shrink ever so slightly and allow you to remove it easily.
Either that, or a bar welded across the race will be point to drift one out when there is no suitable recess.

I was surprised to find out how much the rolling noise was reduced with new wheel bearings all round, as well as new driveshaft and halfshaft universal joints. Even when none of the replaced parts gave any warning noise like was the case with Beryl.
 

sdibbers

Well-Known Member
Either that, or a bar welded across the race will be point to drift one out when there is no suitable recess.

I was surprised to find out how much the rolling noise was reduced with new wheel bearings all round, as well as new driveshaft and halfshaft universal joints. Even when none of the replaced parts gave any warning noise like was the case with Beryl.
I think UJs would be a good thing for me to update. There’s a take up clonk in the forward propshaft UJ that I know should be seen to.
 

sdibbers

Well-Known Member
Beryl is feeling pretty good these days. One thing that was bugging me was the throttle response was still a bit sharp. I’ve had this for a while, but since I’ve finally got the engine running sweetly and at full power (see the last half of last year’s reports above) I’ve noticed that it’s really hard to drive her smoothly and accelerating out of corners were a little too sudden causing weight transfer that was out of this world.

Those of you that have been following know I made up a ‘seesaw’ adaptor for the throttle control when I switched to HIF6 carbs. I’d made a few at the first time hoping to get it right. But I’d not got it right. I finally made a new one with a longer arm for the ball joint going to the pedal linkage. It’s only 5.0m longer (37.5mm up to 42.5mm) but, wow, what a difference. Pulling away is much smoother, cornering is a hoot now I can accurately modulate the accelerator, and she just feel more civilized. The plus is of course if I feel like hooligan I can still use all the power, but I now have a choice on how to drive. Happy days!

I’ll update the technical drawing I put together on the sticky about the HIF6 upgrade in the 4 cylinder discussion soon.
 
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