Getting back on the road

sdibbers

Well-Known Member
Certainly seems the case. Funny thing was I had the first time this summer. The rings all bedded in within 20 miles, except cylinder 2 and that took 500 miles to bed in. Even then I started having low compression on very cold startups. Hence me pulling the piston again. The new rings bedded in immediately, all I can think was the other rings were faulty from the get go.
 

sdibbers

Well-Known Member
Brakes felt a little off the other weekend. Sure enough found a bit of brake fluid on the pushrod to the pedal. So I ordered new seals for a company called custom spares in Bedford Hills in NY. Pulled the master today and was happy to find it had been resleeved in the past. The old seals were certainly past their best. New seals in and a quick bleed. Brakes feel great again. Old seals only seemed to last 2/3 years. Couldn’t find and any issues with the bore of the cylinder. I did hone it a bit to be safe so I’ll keep an eye on things. Maybe the old seals had been damaged during fitting. I’ve noticed that sleeved cylinders can have a knife edge to the sleeve which can cause issues with the cup washers. I made up a cone from copper pipe that held the seals and made sure they wouldn’t be damaged going in this time around.

Sort of glad about the sleeving as US spec cars had dual circuit brakes so the master is unique.
 

sdibbers

Well-Known Member
Well, the follow up from last week's master cylinder rebuild. The master cylinder is fine now. However, when I pulled the car out of the garage on Sunday morning the reservoir had dropped about 15mm. On the US export cars they have a shared reservoir for the tandom brake master and the clutch master cylinders. This is attached to steel pipes leading down to the cylinders (the reservoir is mounted on top of the steering box behind the carbs LHD remember?). I guess with the work on the master cyl I had disturbed these and they had started leaking down the back of the pipes. You should have seen the smoke screen when I started the car!

Fortunately I had some 1/4" fuel line I could use to replace them all. Careful draining of the reservoir with a siphon tube and not touching the pedals meant I was able to fix it without having to bleed the system again afterwards. Drove the car quite a bit afterwards and all seems good now.

Upshot of this is I now have to strip back and repaint the chassis rail where the brake fluid damaged the POR15 engine bay paint (I didn't think anything would get that!).

In other news, the brakes feel better since the master cylinder rebuild. But still not quite right. I've checked the servos. No fluid in the vacuum chamber, both air valves operating as they should, pedal sinking when you start the engine. All good there.

No leaks in either front or rear calipers. I rebuilt the rears about two years ago and they have been trouble free since then. THe fronts I've not rebuilt, but they seem to be operating correctly. I probably should rebuild them at some point just because they are an unknown quantity.

But, I did find the leak on the left hand output shaft of the diff has become much worse. There was quite a bit of gear oil flung around the disc and caliper (yes I tasted it to be sure, my wife doesn't know this about me yet). So, new oil seals ordered from Jeff at Wins along with new pads as teh old ones are badly contaminated. I can make up a new thrust collar on the lathe if need be but I'm working out how to make the special tool to pull the collar off without risking damage to the output flange housing.

Its all fun isn't it? At least I feel like I have a reason for the brakes not feeling 'right' now.
 

cobraboy

Well-Known Member
Be careful using fuel hose for brake fluid. I used to use Gates fuel hose for the reservoir hoses, but noticed one day that the outside of the hoses had water beading all over them, the fluid was permeating through and attracting moisture.
The stuff that is brake fluid safe is EPDM hose.
 
Top