Napa NADA Leather Interior In Progress

PeterZRH

Well-Known Member
#21
If I had water getting between the metal and walnut veneer , I would be asking WTF was happening somewhere else.
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I left the quarter light open during a storm. The channel in the plastic into which the trim piece slides retains the water and it travels along with capillary action. If there is any way in, it'll find it. As it did with me. I used epoxy to join veneer to aluminium. I should have used the type of lacquer you did. The flat pieces were easy, the curved bit a bloody nightmare.

I did the console in two parts. I cut-out and veneered the dished bit where the handbrake goes and covered the rest in black vinyl. The result was pretty good in a factory sort of way and not "too much wood"

I liked the look and I'm not a purest. I just preferred the original. The P6 is very much a sum of period technology inside and out which never really existed anywhere else. Inside it's kind of a unique transition between traditional and modern that's every bit as distinct as the oddball suspension. There's a feel and smell and that gets lost if you change it. Sometimes you have no choice - the reason "they don't make them that that anymore" is materials have improved and few cars looked as grotty with neglect. Genuinely good original trim is near impossible.

That was "restoration porn" in a good way BTW. referring to the seats.
 
#22
i like "too much wood". I made a walnut interior for my MGB v8 and copied the plastic centre console in wood. I used 1mm thick aviation plywood. If you glue a few layers together while bended, you can get curves. I prefer to use wood as it has identical coefficient of expansion so no cracks if it is heated by the sun. I also used woodglue as it dry's invisible which is useful as the veneer has holes and cracks. I even made my own steering wheel to have a matching color and grain
upload_2017-11-20_20-2-12.png

Peter
 
#23
i like "too much wood". I made a walnut interior for my MGB v8 and copied the plastic center console in wood. I used 1mm thick aviation plywood. If you glue a few layers together while bended, you can get curves. I prefer to use wood as it has identical coefficient of expansion so no cracks if it is heated by the sun. I also used wood glue as it dry's invisible which is useful as the veneer has holes and cracks. I even made my own steering wheel to have a matching color and grain
View attachment 11541

Peter
that is truly an amazing car, love the wood, but it needs just one more tiny detail, the seats would look nice in timber, deck chairs spring to mind, with canvas seats, rather like the old Renault 8"s ......;)
 
#25
I admire your handiwork and the joy of an old car is you can personalize it. How would one go bout veneering that dash top?
Thanks Peter. I used many approx 20 clamps and i put a layer of 1cm thick rubber on to the veneer and then another layer of plywood (to get an even clamping) and then the clamps

Peter
 
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