MOT exempt

#1
Just started looking for a decent 2000 tc . I have had a conversation with my insurance company regarding MOT exempt vehicles . They told me on a new policy they would like proof of roadworthyness or an MOT certificate. They stated that in the event of an accident without any MOT on the vehicle I may be asked to prove that the vehicle was in good condition . Which would be virtually impossible . I have enquired about several cars that are MOT exempt and asked if they would put an M O T on the car prior to sale . I either don’t get a reply or am told it will sail through but they are too busy to do it . Are there a lot of cars for sale that are not road worthy ?
 
#3
Hi Richard , I appreciate what you say but it is very difficult to have a good look underneath without a ramp . If it did fail miserably after I bought it it could be off the road for some time . If I was looking for a project I would go along with your view but I am looking for something better.
 

Hobby

Active Member
#4
You could offer to put it through it's MoT before buying it at your own expense, if it's as good as they say it is they shouldn't object. If they do then that tells you all about the genuine condition and you can walk away...

Like many others I will still be getting Roger MoT'd every year despite it not being needed. It was a stupid idea to get rid of the requirement in the first place!
 

harveyp6

Well-Known Member
#5
I think anyone selling a car that then refuses to put an MOT on it even though it's exempt, for whatever reason, then in my view that car is best avoided. An MOT is only proof of condition at one specific time, but if it's a genuine MOT it should give you some idea of the condition of the testable items, even if you only use that as a guide of whether to go and inspect the car or not. (And I'd never buy blind...)
 
#6
I still have mine MOT'Ed, peace of mind even though I do all servicing and repairs myself. Was wondering when insurance companies would start to put their two penny worth in. Jim
 
#7
He did say it was a very gray area at the moment. And pointed out the difficulty of an owner proving the car was road worthy in the event of an accident. What a get out for the insurance company, no MOT no payout.
I agree with you all cars should be MOTed
 

quattro

Well-Known Member
#10
I have seen P6s with a new MOT, but with the inner sill held together with the carpet and a large helping of hope. The car I looked at prior to finding Sparky, had some serious rust on the side of the boot where the rear top link attaches. It was basically gone and the seller, a garage, said the car was structurally sound and that he would put 12 months ticket on it. So, although an MOT may be an indication, I don't always trust them.

I bought Sparky sight unseen, but I accepted that all that was written, may not be fact, e.g. rust free, never been welded - two inaccuracies in just five words :)

If I wanted a good, useable car to use straight away, then I would go and have a good look around it first, and insist on a good test drive. You won't get much info from getting underneath it, most of what you need to see/test is accessible topside.
 

harveyp6

Well-Known Member
#11
The car I looked at prior to finding Sparky, had some serious rust on the side of the boot where the rear top link attaches. It was basically gone and the seller, a garage, said the car was structurally sound and that he would put 12 months ticket on it. So, although an MOT may be an indication, I don't always trust them.
The only advantage in that situation is that you can make a complaint to VOSA, and as any serious corrosion found within 3 months of the test will be investigated, and with the toplink mountings there's not much excuse for not seeing it at the time of testing.

That said I don't trust an MOT either, (especially with the number of u/s ball joints I found straight after a brand new MOT) but at least now there is the MOT history that can be checked, and having a new MOT would make me more likely to go and view, if only so I could find loads of failures and bad mouth the tester who passed it....
 
#12
I have seen P6s with a new MOT, but with the inner sill held together with the carpet and a large helping of hope. The car I looked at prior to finding Sparky, had some serious rust on the side of the boot where the rear top link attaches. It was basically gone and the seller, a garage, said the car was structurally sound and that he would put 12 months ticket on it. So, although an MOT may be an indication, I don't always trust them.

I bought Sparky sight unseen, but I accepted that all that was written, may not be fact, e.g. rust free, never been welded - two inaccuracies in just five words :)

If I wanted a good, useable car to use straight away, then I would go and have a good look around it first, and insist on a good test drive. You won't get much info from getting underneath it, most of what you need to see/test is accessible topside.
 
#13
If I wanted a good, useable car to use straight away, then I would go and have a good look around it first, and insist on a good test drive. You won't get much info from getting underneath it, most of what you need to see/test is accessible topside.

quattro I totally agree with having a good look around the car . I could not bring myself to buy a car blind.
Being new to P6s I would like to be guided as to where to look see/test topside. one comment i read said take the back seat out , how can you do that to some one elses car ? help please. Jim
 

cobraboy

Well-Known Member
#14
A genuine seller will not mind you looking carefully.
A major rust spot is on the inner sill at the rear. The rear seat squabs should just lift out by pulling up at the front edge, then lifting out. When out look at the rear end of the inner sill where it meets the wheel arch. There will be sound deadening felt there, lift this up and look at the inner sill wall and the base of the floor in the small recess near the wheel arch, there should be factory paint and no rust.
Lift the front mats and check floors, and sills up front if you can.
As a barn find the owner of my car gave me free rein to jack it up, remove the outer sill covers, rear seats, carpets, in fact anything I wanted, I was spoilt in that respect, and was rewarded by finding probably one of the most solid P6 cars left.
Obviously check under all wings and floors as well.
 
#15
When l bought the Denovo 3500, the owner was a bit nonplussed when l started pulling the rear seats out & lifting the carpets while he was showing me that the original radio still worked. :D

However l was extremely pleased with what l found.
 

quattro

Well-Known Member
#16
Being new to P6s I would like to be guided as to where to look see/test topside. one comment i read said take the back seat out , how can you do that to some one elses car ? help please. Jim
I’m sure people will add to this, but start with opening the bonnet. There’s a channel down both sides, between the bolt on wing and inner wing. You may find rust along here, then look down the inner wings to the chassis rails as these can rust. If the rubber across the windscreen has failed, the heater can rust out so have a good feel around there.

Under the front wheel arches behind the wheel is the sill closer and these are subject to all of the water thrown up by the front wheels. Press your thumb into it about an inch or so from the bottom, if it feels crusty and starts to give, then it could be letting water into the sill, which is a problem. Above this there is a horizontal seam and just above that is where the front suspension is held in. Have a good poke around here as they can rust badly and this is the main structure of the car. Turn the front wheel all the way one way, and check the lower link for rust and ball joints/rubbers. Then turn it all the way the other way and check the other one.

The outer sills are screwed on and are not structural. If you run your hand down them and under the car, you will feel the screw heads, and a little further you will feel the edge of the screw on sill and then the floor of the car. This bit is actually the lower part of the box section sill which runs along the car. Push your finger tips into this all the way along and check for areas that start to give and crackle.

Under the rear wheel arches in front of the wheel is another area subject to the full force of the water from the rear wheels. If this had rusted then similar to the front, it can let water into the sill, which just sits there and rusts it away from the inside. It can also allow water into the underside of the seat, which Cobraboy mentioned.

In the boot, check the floor then peel the carpet back from both sides. There is a bolt head on each side. This holds the top link for the rear suspension. If the area around these is rusted, they need to be repaired as the handling gets very interesting if these break away.

Open the rear doors and check around the D post and the channel holding the door seal rubbers. Lift the rear seat squab as CB says above. Then in front of this, you can get to the rear of the inner sill. Run your hand down this to where it joins the floor, and push into the sill with your fingertips. It should be solid, and dry. If it gives and shows signs of rust, then this is quite a complicated repair.

Open the front doors and pull the front carpets up as much as you can. Check the inner sills in the same way as the rear bits, and make sure there is no wetness there.

My car was rust free and never been welded :) - check this out.

Sparky's winter/spring/summer/autumn work

Don't let this scare you though as the P6 is fairly easy to work on, as all of the panels, including the roof, unbolt. Also my car would have roadworthy with less than half of that lot, I just went a bit over the top :)

I hope this helps.
 
#18
Thank you so much, Quattro and Cobra boy . I have found both your comments really helpful . I am looking forward to viewing now .
I totally agree with Chalky that the explanation Quattro made should be a sticky .
Thanks again you don’t realise have helpful you have been .
 

Ban306

Active Member
#19
There is probably an endless list you could add to this, but like Cobra said any genuine seller would give you all the time in the world if not walk away,
Touch the engine when you arrive see if it is hot you really want to see it running from a cold start look for smoke,
Check the oil on the dipstick make sure there is no white stuff on it or inside the old cap could mean head gasket trubble,
Also get the engine hot make sure there no over heating from the engine, knocking or strange sounds
When you go for a test drive if you get that far make sure you try all the gears and listen out for things, and also try doing a full lock on the steering when slowly rolling full left lock and then right lock listen for knocking, also have a look at the engine for oil they can leak from the back of the engine near the bulkhead/ heater box also test everything turn every switch on make sure it all works
wipers the lot all these little things that don’t work can soon add up and maybe a bargaining tool for you over the price, the old fuse box is rubbish on theses cars and can catch fire I would also look in the driver side glove box and pull the cover off the fuse box with a torch inspect the wires for burn marks and fuse box itself
 
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