how do I remove the rear springs?

#1
Hi there,
I have saggy rear springs, one side is lower than the other
The workshop manual only gives instruction on how to remove and replace the shock absorber.
It only mentions that if attention is needed to the rear springs, then remove them.......but no instructions.
So what is the procedure, is it possible as a do it your-selfer?

Peter
 
#2
Once you've supported the car & removed the shock, put a trolley Jack under the rear of the spring support arm (that's it's technical name) at the De-Dion elbow & take the weight. Remove the bolt from the arm/elbow joint then slowly let the arm down with the jack to release the tension from the spring. When all the tension is out, pop the spring off if it hasn't already fallen out. Take note of the spring shims.
Compared to front spring removal, it's a doddle.
 
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quattro

Well-Known Member
#3
I would be tempted to put the jack under the end of the spring support arm, prior to removing the shock.

Just a thought

Richard
 

harveyp6

Well-Known Member
#5
Once you've supported the car & removed the shock, put a trolley Jack under the rear of the spring support arm (that's it's technical name) at the De-Dion elbow & take the weight. Remove the bolt from the arm/elbow joint then slowly let the arm down with the jack to release the tension from the spring. When all the tension is out, pop the spring off if it hasn't already fallen out. Take note of the spring shims.
Absolutely no need to split the lower arm from the elbow. Support the lower arm before removing the damper and then lower the arm to remove the spring.
 

harveyp6

Well-Known Member
#7
Is that how we (or you) did it? It was apart so long l got memory fade. I need to pay more attention. :rolleyes:

Even easier than first thought then.
In that instance we fitted a pinion crossmember and two trailing arms as a unit, with the elbows left in place. Do you remember how difficult it was getting the trailing arm to elbow bolts back in? And after we'd done that, what did we do then? Ah yes, we fitted the springs.....:D

Pay attention at the back there....;)
 
#8
Yes, l recall it was a bit of a bugger fitting that last bolt in especially.

So if just changing springs the removal of the shock gives enough movement to remove the spring. Interesting.
Pity the fronts aren't so obliging.
 
#9
Thank you all for the advice.
Has anyone made a movie of the job?
So are you saying that the shocker holds the spring in place?
I notice that there is a rod attached to the axle hub, is that removed first so as to let the arm lower down?

Peter
 

harveyp6

Well-Known Member
#11
I just looked in the WM and in there it does say to split the lower arm from the elbow to allow the lower arm to come down far enough to get the spring out. They obviously like making things hard for themselves, as undoing the 4 bolts holding the halfshaft to the diff achieves exactly the same thing with a lot less hassle.
 
#12
hi Harveyp6,
thank you for the extra info.
So to recap: I support the curved arm of the tube, unbolt the half-shaft on both sides, remove the shock absorber , then lower the trailing arm to remove the spring.



p6dedion1.gif

Peter
I have noticed that with the handbrake on, it only locks one brake disk, is this normal?
 

harveyp6

Well-Known Member
#13
So to recap: I support the curved arm of the tube, unbolt the half-shaft on both sides, remove the shock absorber , then lower the trailing arm to remove the spring.
That sounds about right.





I have noticed that with the handbrake on, it only locks one brake disk, is this normal?
Looks like you have another little problem to sort out there. Still, at least you'll have the halfshafts disconnected.
 

Demetris

Well-Known Member
#14
I just looked in the WM and in there it does say to split the lower arm from the elbow to allow the lower arm to come down far enough to get the spring out. They obviously like making things hard for themselves, as undoing the 4 bolts holding the halfshaft to the diff achieves exactly the same thing with a lot less hassle.
I don't understand why having to get under the car to remove 4 (usually bloody tight) bolts with lock tabs (that often need replacement) is a lot less hassle than removing just the front arm to elbow bolt working on the side of the car.

If you have access to a pit/2 post/4 post and a rattle gun i accept that you want to avoid the hassle of aligning the arm bush - elbow holes, but with only a trolley jack and a couple of stands/blocks of wood, i wouldn't bother with the halfshaft if i only had to change the spring.
 

quattro

Well-Known Member
#15
Hmmm... I will always support the weight of the car, and then put a jack under the end of the spring support arm.

Then undo the top of the shock, remove the bolt at the elbow, then lower the arm thus releasing the spring.

Reasons - 1/. The bolts that hold the bottom of the shock plate often rust in place and are a bugger to remove without breaking, so I leave them well alone if possible.

2/. Removing that rear bolt can be a hassle, but it will show up any rust, weakness, or damage to the elbow and the bush.

3/. You really need to be sure you have the weight supported well before crawling underneath and undoing those half shaft bolts, they need a lot of pull and can pull the car off the stands if unwary.

4/. With the spring arm released, it will also show up any play in the front bush.

I was once helping some lads rebuild a P6 which was well supported over a pit, with the rear wheels off. Two underneath in the pit refitting the rear calipers and one in the back undoing the top of the shocks to replace them. Now there was no support under the suspension, it was just hanging on the shocks. I advised the chap in the back to stop what he was doing :eek:

Keep it safe :)

Richard
 

harveyp6

Well-Known Member
#19
do you think that one side of the adjuster mechanism is rusted solid, and so only gripping on one rotor
It could be that the caliper has failed to adjust up, or the caliper or linkage has seized, or the pivot pin has seized, but the only way to know for certain what's going on is to get under there and have a look.
 

GRTV8

Well-Known Member
#20
Talking about Rear Springs -What do the colours painted on the springs denote? Im after some new springs and the sellers has different colours on his inventory of new springs . save me crawling under the car. Do they offer different ride hardness. I am led to believe these spring are both a 2000-3500 fitment. As you can see Geezed has a list
 

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