Dutch member, English car

#1
Hi to all! Since a week, I'm the proud owner of a P6 2000 TC from 1968. Originally from the country of origin (so a RHD), it crossed the channel in 1999. Since then, it has been standing for most of the time, since it was owned (I think from 2003 on) by a collector who has not or hardly driven the car. I bought it - unseen - at an auction, and now I have the challenge to get it back on the road again (the last official check up was about 20 years ago). I am very pleased with the car, but will undoubtedly have to spend many hours in my shed ;-) And for tips and tricks, I know where to find you all :)

Kind regards,
Bram Toussaint Raven
 

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falkor

Active Member
#2
how much did you get it for Bram?

bodywork looks fine ! what's the major hiccup with it? any priority issue that needs addressing? have you driven it at all yet?

by the way WELCOME!!:D
 
#3
;-) No, I haven't driven it yet, it came by trailer. The motor has been running, but I didn't get it started unfortunately. Brakes are not in working order (and it figures: the brake fluid container is broken, so there's no pressure). I've found one big rust spot that has to be welded: the inside of the sill in the drivers compartment. Overall there is not that much rust, although it's certainly not rustfree ;-) The interior in the back has a nice patina, but in the front it's dried out and cracked. Not my main concern though.
I've already cleaned out the boot and treated it with Fertan; it was mainly surface rust. My current occupation is the thermostat housing: it won't come off! The studs are corroded, I guess the thermostat hasn't been looked at for about 20 years. So this is a real concern, it's seized solid :-( I actually think of sacrificing the housing and 'braking' it to pieces, to get to those &$%@&$ studs.
The underside has been treated with tectile, 20 years ago. And as we know, that can be good but it can also be bad (= hiding rust that eats away at the body without being noticed). But since the car hasn't been driven for a very long time, I think (hope) this will turn out to be ok.
Ah yes, what did I pay: the winning bid was 1600 euros (plus 140 auction fee, plus 140 transport). So all in all not a bad deal, I think.
 

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#6
Niet bepaald om de hoek, woon zelf in Maastricht. Ben benieuwd naar de voortgang van je project! Ga je nog een topic bijhouden in het 'Members Projects' gedeelte? Als je op Facebook zit, daar zijn o.a. de ROCH en een aantal Engelse clubs actief. Succes! :)
 
#7
(... or should we speak English, out of hospitality and so everyone understands ...) I don't know if I have the discipline to keep track of a Members Project ;-) but will certainly think about it! And on FB, I am indeed a member of 1 of those mentioned, I believe. It's nice to know there are so many enthusiasts!
 
#9
Hello Bram,

Sort of in the same position. Someone forgot about this P6 2000SC (original Belgian car), only after moving the new hourse-owner asked when he would pick it up! :eek: That was back in the eighties. Then it stood somewhere, again forgotten, so third owner, but it wasn't on the road for many many years. Fluids changed, charged battery, fuel and it roared into life as soon the petrol entered the engine. Quality stuff these Rovers.
Brakes done, no charging dynamo yet, anti-rust treatment ongoing, trying to get the original leather back from its cardboard state, etc.

Only need to sort the valve on the brake master as the brakes keep on braking after you release the pedal and it is back on the road.
Lots of stuff then still to attend to, but at least it can be driven.
Nice to have limited rust, same here, it was always garaged. Good technical cars, like to work on them. Good luck with getting it back on the road.

Regards from a Dutchman in Belgium,

Rob
 
#10
Nice! ... but I see no picture(s)? Keep me (us) posted, I’m curious how your project will proceed!
Did I mention my thermostat housing that won’t come off? Still hoping for good advice I’m thinking of ‘braking’ the thing to pieces, to get to the corroded studs.

Looking forward to some pics of your car
 

ghce

Well-Known Member
#12
Did I mention my thermostat housing that won’t come off? Still hoping for good advice I’m thinking of ‘braking’ the thing to pieces, to get to the corroded studs.

Looking forward to some pics of your car
Gentle persuasion ;) but be warned stud breakage is really common after so many years. Penetrating oil, heat cool, rinse and repeat. Dont envy your task.
 
#13
Hi Bram you car is amazing for being stored for so long I guess it was indoor storage not outside ?
Yes, it must have been! I’m was told that it was bought in 2003 by a collector, and it hasn’t been tested (APK/MOT) since. It must have been kept inside, and probably next to a window, in the sun: leather is like cardboard and the window rubbers have curled and are hard and cracked
 
#17
If you can get it running on a budget, you've done very well for yourself! S1 cars are in general a little more valuable. But if you're not in it for a profit, but for the enjoyment of it it doesn't matter that much does it? :)
 
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