Very Effective Leather Oil

#1
I recently came across this product: https://www.obenaufs.com/obenaufs-oil-s/112.htm
lt got mostly excellent reviews & after a couple of coats of the oil on the new drivers seat for Bruiser, l think l can see why. The leather has really softened up very quickly indeed. I gave my new workboots a going over too which is what the product was originally formulated for. lt can darken the original colour a little but Bruisers seats are black anyway, though l have other seats l'll use it on.
It's quite cheap in the U.S. but they don't ship to the U.K. & outlets for it seem pretty limited. In the end l got the 16oz oil, 8oz LP balm & the 16oz cleaner from Amazon, much as l dislike lining their immense coffers, for £81 inclusive.
Pricey but it seems like it will go a long way & it's a lot cheaper than re-upholstering an interior.
 
#4
Oh yes, l know of it but it doesn't appear to be really suitable for car seats. It doesn't smell too good to start with but over time it can go pretty rancid.

I'm using cling film with the Obenauf's which smells good & softens your hands very nicely too.
 
#5
Pulled this off of the Leather Honey site:

NEVER USE Neatsfoot Oil: One of the most deceiving leather conditioners on the market is Neatsfoot oil. For years this product has been hailed as a successful moisturizing product for leather, however, it continuously has disastrous results. Leather owners are always confused because their Neatsfoot oil applications are only making their leather more brittle. The reason this happens is because Neatsfoot oil is rendered from cow shin and foot bones. This formula tends to oxidize and have a negative effect on leather over time.
 

Chalky

Active Member
#7
Bottle of glycerine from chemist is excellent and about £1.25 a bottle. Slap it on until leather will take no more. No smell doesn’t stain clothes.
 
#8
Apparently "the treatment restores flexibility, but glycerin is hygroscopic and can support mould growth."

l put the seat in Bruiser only a couple of weeks back & when l bought it indoors for oiling the other day it was with a covering of dusty green mould, surprisingly. It's been in my workshop for a couple of years with no sign of mould but l'm guessing the damp weather over the past couple of weeks has encouraged the growth, which is strange though as l've never had it before. l have no idea what's been applied to the seat in the past but it makes you think.
 

Chalky

Active Member
#9
Apparently "the treatment restores flexibility, but glycerin is hygroscopic and can support mould growth."

l put the seat in Bruiser only a couple of weeks back & when l bought it indoors for oiling the other day it was with a covering of dusty green mould, surprisingly. It's been in my workshop for a couple of years with no sign of mould but l'm guessing the damp weather over the past couple of weeks has encouraged the growth, which is strange though as l've never had it before. l have no idea what's been applied to the seat in the past but it makes you think.
Anything will go mouldy if damp and unventilated.
 
#10
After a while though, a fortnight isn't very long & it's odd that it was just that one seat too. It's the only very early seat, the leather appears to be a little thicker than the others.
 
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