Replacing shocks on V8

#1
Hi guys...been doing some googling for a replacement shocks for 1970 V8 but they seem elusive. I need to replace all four and with something not too expensive and reliable. Any links appreciated.
 

PeterZRH

Well-Known Member
#3
The common types are AVO and GAZ. Originals com up fairly frequently. I've almost given up looking for the elusive Koni Classic blacks.
 
#4

GRTV8

Well-Known Member
#5
I have a brand new pair of boxed KYB shockies complete with rubber bushes .
I had a wallowing P6 and bought these to insert into the suspension at a moment of down time in my life ..
An encounter with Mal Clark for a WOF issue and a discussion about the famous P6 wallow ensued , I came away with a Mal Clark upgraded sway bar in my hot hand .
My existing shocks were OK in the end .
You may have my new black KYB's in their red boxes for $150.
They are front jobbies.
Im in Auckland
 
#6
GRTV8 said:
I have a brand new pair of boxed KYB shockies complete with rubber bushes .
I had a wallowing P6 and bought these to insert into the suspension at a moment of down time in my life ..
An encounter with Mal Clark for a WOF issue and a discussion about the famous P6 wallow ensued , I came away with a Mal Clark upgraded sway bar in my hot hand .
My existing shocks were OK in the end .
You may have my new black KYB's in their red boxes for $150.
They are front jobbies.
Im in Auckland
Fantastic. Can you txt me at 027 530 1363 pls. cheers mate.
 
#9
Happy to report that the front shocks have been successfully installed...it's my very first time and have to say it's alot of fun. Thanks Gerald for them. Next week will get the rear ones and go through the learning process again. Happy days.

And here's the pic of the old ones. I can compress them and they never even move back up. Thx to Al for ur advice.
 

Attachments

colnerov

Well-Known Member
#12
Hi, the RHS side is right there should be a thick washer. There is a tool to compress the rubber to fit
the split pin but you can improvise one, put a screwdriver or bar through the outer hole and with a
large screwdriver lever the washer back one side until you can get the split pin started in the inner
hole then lever the other side back as you tap the pin right through. Then spread the legs about 45
degrees and cut off the excess. The split pin already fitted looks a bit small, you need one just slightly
smaller than the hole so it's a nice sliding fit, a bit of grease or copper slip will slow its rusting in.

Colin
 
#13
colnerov said:
Hi, the RHS side is right there should be a thick washer. There is a tool to compress the rubber to fit
the split pin but you can improvise one, put a screwdriver or bar through the outer hole and with a
large screwdriver lever the washer back one side until you can get the split pin started in the inner
hole then lever the other side back as you tap the pin right through. Then spread the legs about 45
degrees and cut off the excess. The split pin already fitted looks a bit small, you need one just slightly
smaller than the hole so it's a nice sliding fit, a bit of grease or copper slip will slow its rusting in.

Colin
What can i say!! It worked and the pin went through. Put the wheel back on and I'm just a happy camper! Still can't believe I have actually
changed 2 front shock absorbers. Thank you.

Is the rear shocks more difficult?
 

vaultsman

Well-Known Member
#14
Well done with the fronts, rear dampers aren't difficult to do.

Remove the rear seat cushions, then the squabs, and you'll see the top mounts for the dampers.
Remove the locknut and nut, then the bush retainer and rubber bush.

Slacken the road wheel nuts and jack up the rear of the car. Support securely on axle stands and remove the wheels.

You'll see the lower end of the damper sits in a plate bolted to the bottom link.
Remove the 4 bolts and spring washers, remove the lower mounting, and remove the damper from the plate.
Fit the lower end of your new damper to the plate.

Jack up the bottom link and guide the top end of the damper into the upper mounting hole.
Refit the lower plate to the bottom link with the 4 bolts and spring washers.

Fit the rubber bush, retainer, nut, and locknut to the top mounting.
Lower the bottom link, and refit the wheels.
Lower the car and refit the seats.
Sorted.

Stan
 

GRTV8

Well-Known Member
#15
That blue one you've removed is a museum piece . It is probably the original woody .
Id like to see the smile on your face when you take her out for her next spin.

Might pay to check those flexible brake lines for cracks / perishing while you've got those wheels off . Doesn't look like the previous owner did much under there if the shokies got that neglected . Dont rely on the WOF man. Just a thought.

We'll have you welding those spanners about and your workshop manual open in no time .

Another thought ,as I know you are a novice with things mechanical > don't rely on the jack to hold your car up while fiddling about under there. Get some adjustable car stands from somewhere like Supercheap Auto .

Do under car stuff on flat ground . Chock the tyres on the opposite side you are working under.

Save ya life many times over.

We want you to have fun in your P6

Gerald
 

SydneyRoverP6B

Well-Known Member
Staff member
#16
When I replace the rear shocks, I don't jack the car up nor remove the rear wheels. Instead I reverse the car up onto ramps and then take them out from there.

Ron.
 
#17
colnerov said:
Hi, the RHS side is right there should be a thick washer. There is a tool to compress the rubber to fit
the split pin but you can improvise one, put a screwdriver or bar through the outer hole and with a
large screwdriver lever the washer back one side until you can get the split pin started in the inner
hole then lever the other side back as you tap the pin right through. Then spread the legs about 45
degrees and cut off the excess. The split pin already fitted looks a bit small, you need one just slightly
smaller than the hole so it's a nice sliding fit, a bit of grease or copper slip will slow its rusting in.

Colin
'GULP'
 
#18
SydneyRoverP6B said:
When I replace the rear shocks, I don't jack the car up nor remove the rear wheels. Instead I reverse the car up onto ramps and then take them out from there.

Ron.
Brilliant idea. But how does that relieve the pressure from the shocks though?
 
#19
GRTV8 said:
That blue one you've removed is a museum piece . It is probably the original woody .
Id like to see the smile on your face when you take her out for her next spin.

Might pay to check those flexible brake lines for cracks / perishing while you've got those wheels off . Doesn't look like the previous owner did much under there if the shokies got that neglected . Dont rely on the WOF man. Just a thought.

We'll have you welding those spanners about and your workshop manual open in no time .

Another thought ,as I know you are a novice with things mechanical > don't rely on the jack to hold your car up while fiddling about under there. Get some adjustable car stands from somewhere like Supercheap Auto .

Do under car stuff on flat ground . Chock the tyres on the opposite side you are working under.

Save ya life many times over.

We want you to have fun in your P6

Gerald
Hey Gerald, you have no idea how wide my smile was. I did a small drive to Kumeu, and what a difference. Simply love it. It does feel like a different car altogether. Cant wait to put the rear ones on.

Those brake hoses did look good. However my next project is to rebuild rear brakes calipers and replace the hoses which was another prescription that Al gave. Front were done months ago and they work very well.

And you are right about them WoF guys eh. My speedo didn't work when i send the car in but it passed anyway. Which is why i live them. Haha.
.

I do have those axle stands actually and use them all the time but i did forget them yesterday thinking I am not going under. Thx for the reminder, u r right i have people and a car dependent on me. :)

So once rear shocks and calipers are tackled and oh fuel sender, i think that's it mechanically. I don't know what else I need to do. The leather seats look tired and a paint job would be great but these are all costly stuff. So will have to wait.

Will keep you guys posted once i get hold of the rear shocks
 

GRTV8

Well-Known Member
#20
rafrover said:
The leather seats look tired and a paint job would be great but these are all costly stuff. So will have to wait.
A cheap way to rejuvenate the leather is to get some pure coconut oil and rub it in . Rub it in every time you walk past them .The leather really soaks it up . Do it for about two or three weeks .
I took all my leather [ not this P6] upholstery out and plonked it in the lounge in front of the TV . I rubbed an oiled up cloth into the seats every time the missus looked like giving me a job . Made me look busy .
The leather will tell you when to stop. The leather softened up beautifully and even some of the colour came back [ well I reckon it did] .
Good for your skin and hair too > nice and shiny .
Gerald
ps. good luck getting the missus to agree to car bits in the lounge.
 
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