Jacking front wheels up for pad change

#1
Hi Guys,

Some advice on jacking for a front brake change please. My front brakes are squealing so I've bought a set of pads. I figure that should be the first change and I'll look at the rotors when I get the wheels up....I've only had the car for a year and never jacked it before. Can you advise where I should be placing my trolley jack under the front? Also where should I put the jack stands? I understand the sills a re a bit fragile? Sorry to be asking a newbie question, I would appreciate your advice.

Regards,

John.
 

cobraboy

Well-Known Member
#2
Immediately behind the front valance and in front of the oil pan is a large crossmember with a flat centre section, you jack there.

If you get the car high enough I have found a handy place for stands is under the main lower arms outboard of the nuts that hold the strut braces. The stands just fit between the nuts and the upright. I keep the weight on the jack and have the stands as backup.

EDIT
Of course if your sills are confirmed as sound, some lengths of bar with a snug fit inserted into the jacking points can be used for stands.
Either way it is up to you to make sure the car is well supported and not relying on the jack.
 
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unstable load

Well-Known Member
#4
If I may offer a suggestion, when you fit the new pads, run a light smear of Copper slip on the edges of the metal backing of the pads where they fit the housing and on the back of the pad where it contacts the piston.

Brake squeal is caused by vibration of the pad at a micrometer level as the pad grips and releases under braking allowing the pad to move in it's retainer in the caliper. The movement generates sound like a cricket rubbing it's wings together and the Copper slip helps alleviate the friction in the housing.
You may also be able to get anti-squeal plates, but I have always used the Copper slip.
 

Tom W

Active Member
#5
I’ve always found putting axle stands beneath the lower arms is a bit precarious. The arms move through quite a wide sweep, and the suspension compresses a lot before the weight is off the jack, so the axle stands can end up splaying out quite a lot at the top as the car is lowered.
 

corazon

Well-Known Member
#7
I like the ceramic brake grease over copper, Mintex do an affordable one called Ceratec, I’ve not looked back since buying it.
If you have tall enough stands my preference is the flat ledge either side of the crossmember

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Jim
 
#9
Guys I’m so embarrassed but I can’t get the hubcaps off! I don’t want to damage them....thank goodness I’ve never had a flat. See picture of hubcaps, any techniques beyond brute force with a screwdriver?
I have the same hubcaps, using a wide flat blade screwdriver gently ease off all the way round the wheel, takes some time.
I made a tool for mine, from 1/2 inch flat steel , 8 inches long, with a small bend at the end , filed to a fine edge.
Taped the bend end with gaffer tape.
Quicker than a screw driver and safer , does not bend the metal...
Maybe rover had a special tool number 5949 for the job?
Peter
 
#11
I have the same hubcaps, using a wide flat blade screwdriver gently ease off all the way round the wheel, takes some time.
I made a tool for mine, from 1/2 inch flat steel , 8 inches long, with a small bend at the end , filed to a fine edge.
Taped the bend end with gaffer tape.
Quicker than a screw driver and safer , does not bend the metal...
Maybe rover had a special tool number 5949 for the job?
Peter
Thanks Peter
 
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