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Draining the fuel tank - p6 2000sc

Discussion in 'Engine 4 cylinder' started by Ulrich, Sep 12, 2017.

  1. Ulrich

    Ulrich New Member

    Just a quick question before I dive in and get my hands dirty, as it were. I need to completely drain the 22 year old fuel from Ulrich the P6's tank and lines - had a look in the factory manual but it's a little short on detail - are the connections to the tank accessible from under the car, or are they best accessed from the boot compartment? Also, has anyone fitted an inline fuel filter to one of these cars? Is it necessary to change the hard plastic fuel pipe to a rubber one to do this?

    Thanks.
     
  2. Vern Klukas

    Vern Klukas Member

    You have to get at them from under the car. The plastic pipe will be brittle, so be careful. BTW, rubber lines will not fit through one of the protection plates under the car but that's another story. The place to put an inline filter is between the fuel pump & the carbs — where you can get at it.

    Yours
    Vern
     
  3. Willy Eckerslyke

    Willy Eckerslyke Well-Known Member

    When I drained mine, I got the back of the car as high as I could;
    Closed the reserve tap by putting it halfway between the two settings;
    Undid the pipe where it enters the pump and pointed the open end into a fuel can;
    Controlled the flow with the reserve tap.

    It was still a horrible job but at least this gave me a degree of control.
     
  4. Ulrich

    Ulrich New Member

    Yes of course, after the pump would best. I'll try the method you suggest Willys, sounds better than the drain at tank method, will let you know how I get on. Many thanks.
     
  5. Vern Klukas

    Vern Klukas Member

    Willy's method sounds much better, very little risk of breaking the lines. I'd also keep in mind that if the car has been sitting that long, there is a possibility that one or both of the lines are partly plugged with varnish & goo.

    Yours
    Vern
     
  6. cobraboy

    cobraboy Active Member

    When my car was laid up 34 years prior to me finding it the owner filled the tank. I think there was still a good jerry can and a half still in it. The bottom of the tank and the lines and fuel pump were blocked with tar. To cut a long story short, I had to change the tank, I tried every thing to clean it, I wish I had scrapped all the lines too, they gave me weeks of trouble.
    The tar would set hard as soon as it had contact with air, Acetone was the only stuff that dissolved it.
    It was a nightmare.
     
  7. Ulrich

    Ulrich New Member

    I seem to have been lucky in that petrol is coming through apparently unhindered, no signs of tar or varnish, although it is bright green, and reluctant to burn. Tested it by soaking some tissue paper in it then lighting it - it burned, but with black smoke aplenty. Fresh petrol, I think, should burn like the clappers, with no smoke. Will refill with fresh when time and weather permit, and let you know how I get on.
     
  8. Ulrich

    Ulrich New Member

    Thanks Vern, lines do seem clear but just in case, what's the best way to get rid of varnish?
     
  9. Ulrich

    Ulrich New Member

    Oh my gosh, that sounds awful. No sign of any blockages on fuel lines, but it's early days yet!
     
  10. colnerov

    colnerov Well-Known Member

    Hi, Interesting, you're lucky it's not coming through brown. What does it smell like? It could be stale petrol, probably about half an octane now. Maybe someone has put some of the fuel oils (diesel, heating oil or paraffin) in it to hopefully stop the tank rusting which would explain the reluctance to burn.

    Colin
     
  11. Ulrich

    Ulrich New Member

    Hi Colin, now that you come to mention it, you may well be right about something being mixed with it. It smells odd, a bit oily, so could well be paraffin or diesel. I got the car running with some fresh petrol poured into the float chamber, then put the float back on while running, so fuel was being drawn from the tank. I let it run for a few minutes but it was properly smoky - which would tend to confirm your theory. Plugs were fouled afterwards too - hope I haven't done any damage...
     
  12. cobraboy

    cobraboy Active Member

    You cant expect a car to run on 22 year old fuel !
    Fuel starts going off after a couple of weeks, you need to drain and clean everything, replace filters, rebuild fuel pump etc etc
     
  13. Ulrich

    Ulrich New Member

    You're quite right, I think my enthusiasm exceeded itself! Draining today.
     
  14. Quagmire

    Quagmire Active Member

    Mine had sat for 10 years in a garage - i got it started by diluting what was left in the tank (not much) with 20 litres or so of fresh stuff. It still smoked like hell for a couple of minutes when it first came to life!

    Coaxing a car back to life after so long is one of the most satisfying feelings you can get - have fun! :)
     
  15. Ulrich

    Ulrich New Member

    Fun and consternation in equal measure! Progress so far is that the fuel is drained, and refilled with a couple of fresh gallons, but still puffing out clouds of blue-ish smoke at higher revs. It will run for about 15 minutes, then gives up the ghost and dies. On checking the plugs I'm finding all four saturated with oil. Must admit this sounds like serious engine wear, but for all four plugs to be fouled up in this way is surprising - never known this before on any engine - and I've had a few worn out ones over the years! Stuck rings perhaps?
     
  16. Vern Klukas

    Vern Klukas Member

    If it's been sitting that long stuck rings are a possibility. Plugged crankcase ventilation maybe?

    Yours
    Vern
     
  17. Ulrich

    Ulrich New Member

    I had wondered about crankcase pressure being responsible, but looking at the engine, the breather system seems to consist only of the breather on top of the rocker cover, from which a pipe goes to the air cleaner. Are there any other components to the breather system I should check?
     
  18. harveyp6

    harveyp6 Well-Known Member

    There is a wire gauze inside the housing on the cam cover where that pipe comes from, and there should be a flame trap in the hose from a plug on the timing chest to the carburettor.
     
  19. Ulrich

    Ulrich New Member

    Ah yes, thanks Harvey. Took off the pipe from timing chest plug to find pipe itself is clear; poking a piece of wire into the plug revealed sludge in abundance, so it seems there may be some blockage there. I'd like to take this plug off to see what's behind it - is it just a push fit? Didn't want to force it in case I did some damage.
     
  20. harveyp6

    harveyp6 Well-Known Member

    I doubt you'll get the plug out without breaking it, whether it breaks beyond use is by no means certain, but that's the risk you take. They're only held in by the "O" ring, but they are a very tight fit.
     

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