What fuel for 2000 TC?

#1
I have just bought a 1972 2000 TC, which I will pick up tomorrow. I assume it has the 10:1 compression ratio and originally ran on 5-star fuel. What do people use nowadays? Super unleaded? Super unleaded with octane booster? Ordinary unleaded with more octane booster?

I guess the ignition timing could be retarded to suit today's lower-octane fuels, but I'd very much prefer not to do that because it would kill the performnce. Has anyone tried mappable ignition to get the best power from today's fuels without pinking? I'm wondering if a programmable 123 distributor, or an Aldon Ignitor II electronic ignition module with an Aldon Amethyst mappable add-on, would do the trick.

All advice gratefully received!

John
 

roverp480

Active Member
#2
My manager in the day, got his workshop to fit the lower compression pistons used on some export models so he could use 4 star , which was free to his grade , but no 5 star pumps at work.
 
#4
Thank you, gentlemen... Willy, do you still use the original factory ignition timing settings? And if you forget the Valvemaster, does it still run OK on V-Power without detonation/pinking?
 

sdibbers

Well-Known Member
#7
I set the timing by retarding it just enough to prevent pinking. I don't see any need to worry about the factory setting.
That’s best. Modern fuel behaves very differently compared to the stuff current when our cars were new. The timing specs from then are a good guide.

I’ve found they run a little richer with it too.
 
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#11
Thanks all. I shall use the factory figure as a starting point, run it on super unleaded and see how we go from there. Weirdly, modern fuels seem better than past ones at resisting pinking, at least judging by my experience with lightly tuned Hillman Imps (10:1 c/r) which are completely fine on ordinary 95-octane unleaded and factory timing settimgs.
 

roverp480

Active Member
#12
Rover do warn in some of their publications, that high speed pinking, as opposed to full throttle low speed pinking, is difficult to hear and one should be wary of this phenomenon when setting timing by ear.
 

sdibbers

Well-Known Member
#13
Thanks all. I shall use the factory figure as a starting point, run it on super unleaded and see how we go from there. Weirdly, modern fuels seem better than past ones at resisting pinking, at least judging by my experience with lightly tuned Hillman Imps (10:1 c/r) which are completely fine on ordinary 95-octane unleaded and factory timing settimgs.
I believe they use a different standard to measure octane now. The numbers aren't quite the same. Octane Number (RON, MON) | Glossary | Marquard & Bahls
 

Tom W

Active Member
#14
I usually use regular unleaded with an additive. Either Castrol Valvemaster Plus, or Millers VSPe. Occasionally I use super unleaded, again with the additive, though to be honest I can’t tell the difference. My timing is set at the book value at idle, but I think the distributor was slightly tired, resulting in some mechanical advance being applied at idle, and therefore a lower total advance value. I replaced the springs and this perked things up, but it hasn’t caused any pinking. I think you’re right to steer away from retarding the timing too much.

My car is a 2200, so has a slightly lower compression ratio, but does still have the sticker in the rear window specifying not less than 97 octane.
 

Ban306

Active Member
#15
Was there not 2 star 3 star and 4 star I must look up the dates I use Valvemaster Plus and Unleaded never had a problem the P6 was built to last the test of time.
 

Ban306

Active Member
#17
What I would not give for a pint of 5 star :rolleyes:
And the tank was filled for you no self service and a shot of Redex made all the difference :p
How many Stars was there ?
I must cash in my green shield stamps must have a new kettle by now :)
 
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#18
Talk:Octane rating - Wikipedia

As unleaded is 95, super 97/98 either would probably do in the 2000/2200 I'd have thought, especially with an additive. I haven't tried ordinary unleaded but I only do a low mileage so the extra cost of super isn't an issue, I've not found any of my cars over the years run any differently when using those super expensive fuels such as the -Max stuff so don't use them. I'd have thought 5 star would be overkill in the 4 cylinder car, especially an SC?
 

Dave3066

Well-Known Member
#19
I used to use Castrol VM plus and Lucas upper cylinder lubricant. My 2000SC suffered successive bouts of burning out exhaust valves. I'm not sure if this was a result of my carb settings or something else. I'm now using Tetraboost, which is the proper lead stuff they used to put in fuel. I've only just started using it and am on my first tank of fuel. I'll let you know how I get on.

Cheers Dave
 
#20
Interesting that the ingredient that gives that stuff it's name (Tetrethyllead) is banned in most countries 'cause it contains lead! I assume that it must be in very small doses in the additive to get round that! I see for 2019 they've also launched a "conventional" lead replacement additive, wonder why...

Tetraethyllead - Wikipedia
 
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