Rover P6

#1
Morning,I`m looking for a P6 Rover.After spending 16 months restoring a 1934 Rover 12HP and finishing it beginning of July, I` been been told I have to go onto monthly injections for prostate cancer. I was originally told in August, but there were few effects.However I have had to go onto monthly injections and it will be for some time. .The problem is that the side effects of the injections are making driving an old car too much of an effort ,so I need a modern classic and I fancy the Rover P6. Photos of my Rover 12HP I`ts very sad after 25 years of restoring classic cars as a hobby I felt it was time to buy one and fully restore it to keep,but the effort required isnt worth it.
I`ve heard the P6 3500 is the one,but they are commanding a high price. Is there any reason to ignore the 2000 sc or the 2200tc,are they underpowered at all Len
 

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chrisw

Well-Known Member
#2
No reason to ignore a 4-pot at all. It comes down to personal preference.. personally, I prefer 2000s. I've had a few over the years, and currently have a 2000 Auto.
 
#4
I have a 1968 2000 TC that I just finished restoring. The story of the rebuild is covered in a thread located under member projects. The 2000 TC drives well and has enough power to overtake safely at highway speeds. I feel that it is an all around good modern classic.
 

Tom W

Active Member
#5
I have a 2200TC and I don’t find it underpowered. It’s plenty quick enough to use in any traffic. The only downside compared to the V8 is the engine note isn’t as charismatic. I’ve not tried a single carb car, or a 2 litre, but I can’t imagine they’re much slower.
 

PeterZRH

Well-Known Member
#6
Morning,I`m looking for a P6 Rover.After spending 16 months restoring a 1934 Rover 12HP and finishing it beginning of July, I` been been told I have to go onto monthly injections for prostate cancer. I was originally told in August, but there were few effects.However I have had to go onto monthly injections and it will be for some time. .The problem is that the side effects of the injections are making driving an old car too much of an effort ,so I need a modern classic and I fancy the Rover P6. Photos of my Rover 12HP I`ts very sad after 25 years of restoring classic cars as a hobby I felt it was time to buy one and fully restore it to keep,but the effort required isnt worth it.
I`ve heard the P6 3500 is the one,but they are commanding a high price. Is there any reason to ignore the 2000 sc or the 2200tc,are they underpowered at all Len
No P6 is particularly expensive bar truly exception freak examples. No standard P6 is either particularly fast by modern standards. All are fine in traffic although some might find the 2000 auto a little pedestrian for their tastes. It was a popular model in the day though as many (often older) motorists upgrading from their 50s car probably thought it was perfectly quick enough.
 
#7
What a nice '12'. I've never driven one but what causes the effort in the driving, clutch, steering?
The P6 can have a fairly heavy clutch & steering too but PAS can be retro-fitted & the clutch slave can be changed for a bigger one. I'm having both PAS & hopefully the bigger slave fitted to my four-pot though mine has wider wheels fitted which obviously affects the steering operation more than standard wheels.
 
#8
I`m selling the Rover as it isnt a pleasure to drive at the moment,mainly due to the monthly injections Im having There`s many side effects you can get,but I feel sick at times and have headaches ,my joints ache and generally I just feel off it The problem is I will have the injections on a regular basis ,for some time to come .They were every 3 months but now every month,so just settling down,and its time for another one.Mind you ,better than the alternative Difficult to know what to hope for selling the Rover Ive spent a few thousand and know you can`t add labour in if its your hobby.But I would like to return the cost,or most of it .I have it on sale for £12950 which for the overall condition is very fair.I do have some leeway so Ill cross fingers The clutch is very light ,but you have to think ahead with the rod operated drum brakes and though the steering is fine on the straight,its heavy to turn and you have to remember to double declutch on the crash box.Possible the main problem is Im now a young 83,but still old Len
 

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#9
Driving the Rover, wouldn`t normally have caused any problems,but a few of the side effects are ,feeling tired and aching joints and worse slight dizziness at times.So at the moment I am not interested in driving If I do get another it will be something to mess about with until things improve Len
 
#10
never driven a 2000 but having read many reports from owners etc it would seem the 200o ( especially auto) is a bit slow and underpowered. The 2200 tc is about same as a V8 ( so I understand) . having a 3500 auto I can attest they can keep up with modern traffic and give a superb ride. I wish I had bought one with power steering though as doing a '3 point turn' you need a tin or three of spinach and Popeyes strength . though Ok over 5-6mph. Don't buy one without a drive and Mot as I found out hard way they can be a pig to fix ( inboard rear brakes ) and need deep pockets! do check up or have somebody with you when going over one. they can hide horrors for unsuspecting purchasers. personally if I was suffering ill health I would opt for a more basic car easy to work on or get fixed by a garage eg Ford Anglia. good luck.
 
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