Reproduction Walnut Shifter Knob

#1
Hi All

I'm looking into doing a run of reproduction wooden shift knobs, as originally supplied on NADA TC's. The wood part is pretty easy, but the clear gearshift pattern top of the knob will require injection moulding & and expensive tooling for same.

Before taking the plunge, I'd like to ask how many would interested in buying one for their car if the price was around 40-45$ US.

Yours
Vern
 
#4
WarrenL said:
I'd have one if you were doing them for autos.
Automatic knobs would be a whole new project, in some ways easier because it wouldn't have the acrylic top. But also not authentic, as the auto only had one knob. But I'll look into it.

By the way, this is still moving ahead slowly, having some trouble finding a injection molder who is interested in a very small project.

But one change is I think I will be offering complete knobs and just the acrylic tops by themselves, There would be a bit of work to fit them to the knob (they were made slightly oversized and sanded and polished to join the wooden part seamlessly) but it would save an otherwise good knob.

Yours
Vern
 

arthuy

Well-Known Member
#6
There is a company I have used who will do 1 or a million. Plastic Mouldings Irvine, Scotland. They have plants over the world and different skills. I used them for vacuum forming trim panels for the p5.

The tooling as you know is the expensive part but they have people who can do that.

Colin
 

DAK

New Member
#7
Hi All

I'm looking into doing a run of reproduction wooden shift knobs, as originally supplied on NADA TC's. The wood part is pretty easy, but the clear gearshift pattern top of the knob will require injection moulding & and expensive tooling for same.

Before taking the plunge, I'd like to ask how many would interested in buying one for their car if the price was around 40-45$ US.

Yours
Vern
I would be interested in one.
 

sdibbers

Well-Known Member
#9
Has anyone looked at 3D printing that little piece of plastic? Printing is really good for small runs like this would be.
Problem with most clear printed parts is they go yellow pretty quickly when exposed to sunlight. The resigns used are actually cured by UV light so continued exposure tends to ‘over cure’ them. Not only yellowing them but also making them very brittle. A better bet would be to have them CNC machines out of acrylic then polished. In the US first-cut do this relatively inexpensively. I’m sure someone in the U.K. would also be able to help. As for the CAD model I can help with that if you don’t mind a bit of a wait.
 
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