Rear Brakes/Discs

#1
I'm fixing to change out the rear brake pads and discs ( Rover P6, 3500 Automatic, 1972). I have seen a post where the project is approached from the side of the car initially. The rear wheel is removed, and, then, the final drive is disconnected, allowing access to the disk and brakes. It does involve some manipulation of the DeDeon tube, but, seems a much easier method, at least on paper, when compared with the method detailed in the service manual. I'd appreciate any advice anyone may wish to share on this approach, or any other approach to undertaking this project. In addition, are there any ancillary parts (items that often break, typically need to be replaced, etc.) that I should have on hand prior to starting?
Many thanks, everyone!
Drew
 

harveyp6

Well-Known Member
#2
You can do it all without removing the rear wheels. This is the way I do it.

Jack up car and support on stands under the base unit. Knock back driveshaft locktabs and remove bolts. The de dion tube will slide enough to drop the halfshafts down out of the way. DON'T rest them on the de dion tube. Remove discs. Remove clevis pins from caliper quadrants. Remove 2 bolts holding the handbrake mechanism to the diff. Unclip handbrake link spring from caliper and remove the handbrake assy out of the way. Remove pad sliders and shims and pads. Wind back piston cups. Fit new pads shims and springs to calipers. Operate handbrake quadrant levers multiple times to adjust the pads up to the discs, which you slide in and out till you get the right clearance. Refit handbrake linkage and make sure that the quadrants are fully back on their stops. Refit driveshafts.

I don't think I've forgotten anything.

It's probably took me longer to type it than do it.
 
#3
You can do it all without removing the rear wheels. This is the way I do it.

Jack up car and support on stands under the base unit. Knock back driveshaft locktabs and remove bolts. The de dion tube will slide enough to drop the halfshafts down out of the way. DON'T rest them on the de dion tube. Remove discs. Remove clevis pins from caliper quadrants. Remove 2 bolts holding the handbrake mechanism to the diff. Unclip handbrake link spring from caliper and remove the handbrake assy out of the way. Remove pad sliders and shims and pads. Wind back piston cups. Fit new pads shims and springs to calipers. Operate handbrake quadrant levers multiple times to adjust the pads up to the discs, which you slide in and out till you get the right clearance. Refit handbrake linkage and make sure that the quadrants are fully back on their stops. Refit driveshafts.

I don't think I've forgotten anything.

It's probably took me longer to type it than do it.
Harvey-
That's pretty much similar to the service manual directions, is it not? Also, when you say to place the stands under the "base unit", what exactly are you speaking of? Thanks, again. Drew
 

harveyp6

Well-Known Member
#4
That's pretty much similar to the service manual directions, is it not?
I don't know, I can't say I've ever had need to read the WM on that particular subject.



Also, when you say to place the stands under the "base unit", what exactly are you speaking of? Thanks, again. Drew
Anywhere that is strong enough to take the weight, excluding any of the hanging suspension components. Blocks of wood correctly sized slotted into the pinion crossmember with stands underneath will do, or depending on how brave you are, blocks of wood under the rear of the inner sills, or even bars in the jacking points (which is how it's supposed to be done, but most cars are too rotten to take the weight.)
 
#5
I don't know, I can't say I've ever had need to read the WM on that particular subject.





Anywhere that is strong enough to take the weight, excluding any of the hanging suspension components. Blocks of wood correctly sized slotted into the pinion crossmember with stands underneath will do, or depending on how brave you are, blocks of wood under the rear of the inner sills, or even bars in the jacking points (which is how it's supposed to be done, but most cars are too rotten to take the weight.)
Thanks, Harvey. I'll give it a go.
 
#6
If your discs are old stock & will take a skim without going below the minimum thickness then l would do that. Some new discs seem to be of questionable quality, skimmed in the U.K but manufactured 'elsewhere'.
Before you do anything to the old ones though, give them the Harvey test. Drop them flat onto a concrete floor from beer belly height. If they survive without breaking then get them skimmed & if they don't, then don't.
 
#7
If your discs are old stock & will take a skim without going below the minimum thickness then l would do that. Some new discs seem to be of questionable quality, skimmed in the U.K but manufactured 'elsewhere'.
Before you do anything to the old ones though, give them the Harvey test. Drop them flat onto a concrete floor from beer belly height. If they survive without breaking then get them skimmed & if they don't, then don't.
Well, I'll definitely check the measurements and skim them if appropriate. As far the "Harvey Test", I may save that for another time :))
 
#8
Best to find out before than after.

Although, my last pair survived the first test, got skimmed then came back, one with a tiny tell-tale mark, got tested again &.......

20210405_210323.jpg

Better off than on the car.
 
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#9
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