Oil drainage after resting

sdibbers

Well-Known Member
#1
I’ve noticed that after leaving the car for about 4-5 days it takes a couple of seconds for oil pressure to build. I can only assume the oil is draining back into the sump and the pump is taking a while to get it up again. I know there’s the ‘weir’ as Rover calls it that allows the pump to self prime. But has anyone come up with a way to help reduce the pressure build time after a week’s layup?

Main and rod bearings are brand new, pressure is excellent when started and remains so. Oil filter has an anti drain valve as it should also.
 

Demetris

Well-Known Member
#2
We 've been discussing this again a good few years ago. The Rover 4 cyl is prone to do this because the oil filter is fitted upside down, and because of its physical dimensions it takes a while to fill up. In my experience the delay in order to build up oil pressure varies with the oil filter used. Of course, all of them have some sort of anti-drain valve inside, but the effectiveness of the device seems to vary between different makes of filter. If i remember correctly, the last ones that i used were made by Surefilter and they are not too bad. If you are over concerned on this, you could always let the engine spin on the starter for a while (i.e. don't pull the choke or disconnect the coil) before attempting a start. This is what i do after a few days of rest.
 

roverp480

Active Member
#3
Anti drain Filters do vary, it needs both a stack tube inside and a valve on the peripheral holes . The gauge/ light both have restrictors, so don't immediately respond to the pressure rising, especially with cold oil. A second or two delay starting from cold , is probably not something to be too concerned about.
 

sdibbers

Well-Known Member
#4
I've tried a few, Bosch were the worst I found. Surprisingly, Fram were better. Not found any with the stick tube in them recently.
 

Demetris

Well-Known Member
#5
Try these: SUREFILTER
If i can find them over here, you probably can find them too. I don't have the correct part number for our cars at the moment, but when i will be back home in a few days, i will look it up.
 
#7
The filters with stand pipes are commonly available for commercial applications, the Wix 51806 is a good part number to cross reference. But you still have to be vigilant, not unusual for cross references to be inaccurate.

Yours
Vern
 

sdibbers

Well-Known Member
#9
I changed the oil today (500 mile change after the new rings, main and big end bearings change). I’d had Bosch filters before and a Britpart filter this time fitted. On inspection neither had the stand tube inside. I’ve fitted a new Fram filter after checking it, guess what? It has the stand tube! Only had time for a quick test drive. So I’ll know tomorrow if this has helped. To be honest it’s got to be better having a couple of pints of oil waiting to go into the bearing like that.
 

Chalky

Active Member
#13
Just watched chasing classic cars which had a v12 Ferrari with fram ph oil filters fitted. They are upside down exactly the same as on 4 pot Rovers. If they’re good enough for a 4 million pound car they’re good enough for me!
 
#14
Just watched chasing classic cars which had a v12 Ferrari with fram ph oil filters fitted. They are upside down exactly the same as on 4 pot Rovers. If they’re good enough for a 4 million pound car they’re good enough for me!
hey our cars are worth at least 4 mil possibly more? :D
skies the limit!
 

sdibbers

Well-Known Member
#16
Thanks Demetris. That looks like Joe Curto's store as he's based in College Point in Queens, NY. The Fram one I fitted seems to really help having been fitted with a tube. But its good to know that a good quality one is available nearby.
 
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