OCC 469 - restoring & running a "sharkstooth" 2000

cobraboy

Well-Known Member
It would be best not to pull that knob until you have bought a new O ring seal to go inside the valve that you have found by the firewall.
Once moved that valve may leak and the O ring is a special fuel resistant Viton one, not available just anywhere.
 
Hi Cobraboy,
I wish I did not pull that knob... but I did as a child would with a new toy, right?...
So an O ring has to come on my shopping list then, thanks a lot for the hint!
 

Phil Robson

Well-Known Member
Very nice & original :). Rover did think of most things!

I've sorted the bent passenger's glove box by reusing the vinyl on a straighter box. This is what it was like:

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...and this is the straight one: :)

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Phil Robson

Well-Known Member
Just flicking through some old pictures on the computer (as you do at the moment...;)) & came across these of OCC:

My apologies if you've seen them before :rolleyes::D

As originally found - a genuine 'barn find' - in March 2004:

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Starting the strip down in 2005:

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It was very very bad...

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Same side, some time later....

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Getting further in 2007:

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Looking nice underneath now (if anyone has a solid driveshaft for sale like the left hand side one, please let me know..):

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Still with some paint to do in July last year:

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I might even be able to get some paint prepping done over the next few weeks!

(I wonder what my wife, Karen is thinking sitting there....?)
 

chrisw

Well-Known Member
Solid driveshafts must be pretty rare these days. I've got a spare pair, but they're too rare to go anywhere.

I wonder if we could turn some new ones?
 

Phil Robson

Well-Known Member
Both OCC's had been cut through at some point :eek: presumably because the brakes were seized. You can see the stub of the o/s one in the picture of the sill remains above.

I still have the old ones (I think) & I have thought about getting them repaired but local engineering shops think it would be very difficult to make them strong & balanced. The fact that you don't see them makes them less of an issue, but I know one is not correct... :rolleyes:

I got the one with the yellow stripes of somebody many years ago (I'm sorry if you're on here - I just can't remember who from). I was told at the time that it was from a P6 prototype, which is why I put the stripes on it to differentiate it from the other (when I get one).
 

cobraboy

Well-Known Member
Great pics
Try contacting a propshaft company such as Bailey Morris regarding repairing the shafts. It would be bread and butter work for them.
 

harveyp6

Well-Known Member
Both OCC's had been cut through at some point :eek: presumably because the brakes were seized. You can see the stub of the o/s one in the picture of the sill remains above.
Presumably it was easier and quicker to cut through the shafts than to take out the 4 outer pad retaining bolts and knock the outer pad out from beween the disc and the caliper.... Knocking the pads out on seized brakes must have taken me all of a couple of minutes to do the last time I did it, and those brakes were seized solid.



I still have the old ones (I think) & I have thought about getting them repaired but local engineering shops think it would be very difficult to make them strong & balanced. The fact that you don't see them makes them less of an issue, but I know one is not correct... :rolleyes:
It is possible to do them in a well equipped home workshop if you have the ability. A mate of mine has a Jag rear end in a rod, and he decided he wanted hexagonal section driveshafts, so he just set about it and made them, and that would be more difficult than just making the solid Rover round section shafts. Balance is a lot less of an issue on such a narrow shaft.
 

Phil Robson

Well-Known Member
Presumably it was easier and quicker to cut through the shafts than to take out the 4 outer pad retaining bolts and knock the outer pad out from beween the disc and the caliper.... Knocking the pads out on seized brakes must have taken me all of a couple of minutes to do the last time I did it, and those brakes were seized solid.
Quite - but I think the old owners wouldn't know this (frightening inboard discs & all that) & as the rear wings were off, hack-sawing through the driveshafts would seem the easy option :(
 

cobraboy

Well-Known Member
I may well give them a ring, thanks :)
Phil
Despite using Bailey Morris for both work and personal use with good results I have been contacted by a forum member to say that they have had experience of less than perfect results from BM.
I have always had good results, but I am happy to pass on the caveat.

M
 

harveyp6

Well-Known Member
Dunlops though.. four calipers, rather than the two on girlings. Little more complex?
I had forgotten that, but in that case it's just a matter of removing the piston housings from the caliper bracket, so up my time estimate to 10-15 minutes. In fact you don't even need to remove them, just slacken them off a bit.
 

Phil Robson

Well-Known Member
I was fortunate to get a pair of early driveshafts from a member on here & literally a few days after they arrived the o/s tubular shaft started rumbling & needed its UJs replacing. Time to fit a correct drive shaft I thought...

Before:

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After:

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The rear discs have excellent brake pad contact over their whole radius - they're Dunlops on this car.
 

Phil Robson

Well-Known Member
I have also started to strip the paint from the bonnet ready for spraying. It wasn't the best finish I've seen ;):

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I have most of it off now :cool:. I was going to replace the bonnet as it had been welded up on each side due to some mirrors being on when I got it; the repair had badly distorted the bonnet on one side but I've just about got it sorted now. My spare was off a '67 TC I think & the bracing is slightly different. Also, the prop is at the side rather than in the middle. An early 2000 has it like this:

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Phil Robson

Well-Known Member
Another thing I've wondered about on OCC is whether its boot lock is the wrong way up, or if early cars were all like it?

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It's the only one I can remember this way up!
 
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