NOS or “Retro” Brake Discs?

#1
Hi folks

I need new front brake discs to get my Series 1 2000TC 1970 back on the road. Being in the far right hand corner of the world there don’t appear to be any in the country so postage from the UK is going to be painful. Is it worth paying extra for NOS items as opposed to “pattern” modern units? Any feedback would be very welcome. Thanks!
 

PeterZRH

Well-Known Member
#2
If the pattern parts are properly made, there should be no problem. It's just a steel disk, there's no great secret to making them. I know Colin had problems a while back with them being out of balance. I don't know if this is still the case.
 

jp928

Well-Known Member
#3
I think 'just a steel disc' is trivializing the qualities needed in a disc that will work properly, and have an economic life. Down here in Oz our club has had a run of v8 discs made, machined and tested, using, I am informed, the same material spec that goes into competition parts. Time will tell how well they perform,but I have ordered a set.
From 'https://irispublishers.com/mcms/pdf/MCMS.MS.ID.000531.pdf' comes
"Based on their functions, brake disc materials should have high strength even at elevated temperatures, high thermal conductivity, excellent abrasion resistance, good creep resistance, high stiffness and superior corrosion resistance [2]. "
 

PeterZRH

Well-Known Member
#6
I think 'just a steel disc' is trivializing the qualities needed in a disc that will work properly, and have an economic life. Down here in Oz our club has had a run of v8 discs made, machined and tested, using, I am informed, the same material spec that goes into competition parts. Time will tell how well they perform,but I have ordered a set.
From 'https://irispublishers.com/mcms/pdf/MCMS.MS.ID.000531.pdf' comes
"Based on their functions, brake disc materials should have high strength even at elevated temperatures, high thermal conductivity, excellent abrasion resistance, good creep resistance, high stiffness and superior corrosion resistance [2]. "
Are discs for a 60 year old car that special? Or is it merely just normal tech for the time? The question was about compared to OEM. I expect you could improve on them if you tried. But I'm guessing what came from the factory was extremely vanilla for the time. Being merely the right diameter and stud pattern.
 

chrisw

Well-Known Member
#7
Talk to the local clubs, and see where people get them from. Used to use Repco for locally sourced parts, back in the day.

I wouldn't go overboard with originality.
 
#8
First pair fitted to my 3500S had significant vibration/judder on braking. I was advise it would be a MOT failure, so replaced them with another set, from a different supplier, and no trouble since.
Both sets of discs were 'pattern parts' from approved Rover parts suppliers. I was told by mechanic who fitted the first set that he thought they were of Chinese origin, but can't confirm that.
If you can get NOS, then go for them, if not buy from approved supplier, and do not throw away the old discs until you have test driven the new
 
#10
See how you go locally. Fosseway make performance discs in UK. I've a pile of new 2000 discs though I'm in Sydney and they aren't light...Mind you Aus to NZ postage is much better than from the old dart.
PM me if you need them I'll need a very precise diameter as there are small differences between year models for 2000s

Are the ones on the car past machining?
Michael
 
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#11
Hi folks. Thanks for your contributions. I have a lead on some second hand items in Wellington from a series 1 2000SC which I assume will be interchangeable (?). Any thoughts on what the minimum thickness should be to make them worth fitting? Michael - thanks for your kind offer. How do I PM you?
 
#12
From the workshop manual, after re-facing minimum thicknesses are:
Front - .455" (11.43mm)
Rear - .330". (8.38mm)

l think they're from the 3500 manual but l assume they'll be good for the 2000 too.
 

jp928

Well-Known Member
#13
FWIW I am told that the main difference between 4cyl and8 cyl car discs is on the diameter - ie, turn down the edge of V8 disc and it will fit in a 4cyl caliper. Otherwise the same.
 
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