My Rover

Very unfortunate, and very annoying!
On the plus side, that is a sign of a good buisness, accepting responsibility, and agreeing to put it right, and waiving the fees.
Credit to them
 

mrtask

Well-Known Member
Ooof! What a downer. Commiserations, Ron. At least the extent of the damage isn't too bad, and the company have admitted liability and offered to make it all good again. Hope they make a good job of it and you get your ride back soon enough. Can you/they get a good replacement straight bumper for less than the cost of repairing, straightening out and rechroming the old one?
 

SydneyRoverP6B

Well-Known Member
Staff member
eightofthem wrote,...
On the plus side, that is a sign of a good buisness, accepting responsibility, and agreeing to put it right, and waiving the fees.
Credit to them
Yes, they are a very good business that have always done excellent work where my Rover has been concerned. No one is perfect, mistakes happen, the person responsible was very distressed by what had happened and the accident was clearly unintentional.

mrtask wrote,...
Hope they make a good job of it and you get your ride back soon enough. Can you/they get a good replacement straight bumper for less than the cost of repairing, straightening out and rechroming the old one?
Hi Mr T,

I have my Rover with me. I have obtained a quote for repairing and repainting both the guard and the valance. Obtaining a used front bumper locally wasn't really an option, as the businesses that used to be in Sydney that sold second hand Rover parts have either closed down or rationalised the stock that they carry. The business that will be repairing both the bar and the over rider along with chroming both have already collected it from me. It is not costing my anything, only time, as I'll be removing the valance before it goes for repair/painting to clean up the inside and then paint it with POR 15.

The two near side bumper retention brackets were twisted slightly, so I'll be straightening those.

Ron.
 

SydneyRoverP6B

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Over the past 7 to 10 days, I had noticed an occasional clicking sound emanating from the O/S rear. I strongly suspected one or both universal joints within that half shaft as being responsible.

So this morning, I removed the shaft with inspection revealing that my suspicion was correct. The inner universal joint was quite rough along one axis. This shaft was a NOS item that I had obtained some years ago; with the universal joints being factory fitted sealed GKN Spicer units. Between April 5, 2011 and today, 76,626 Miles (123,368km) of service had been provided.

From my experience, the sealed units don’t last as long as those that I have used that sport grease nipples, and even more so when the former are factory fitted. I suspect the scant amount of grease that they may have been within is primarily responsible, especially if the NOS universal joints that I seen over the years are anything to go by.


Stains are evident where the grease that was once within has departed.


I’ll fit new Hardy Spicer universal joints complete with grease nipples into this shaft, then store away until it is required for service once again.


The elbow looks solid and corrosion free.


After wiping the dust off, the chamfer is still bright, 40 years after being fitted to the car.


A layer of dust, but nothing to suggest anything untoward.


The bushes in the trailing arms were fitted during October 2008. Over the ensuing 6 years, 100,000 Miles (160,000km) of sterling service has been provided.




The bump stop and surrounds look dusty but otherwise in fine condition. Not bad for a car that has covered over half a million km!


The replacement half shaft, the universal joints I had fitted during April this year.


Nice and clean and ready to install.


Back in place, tags knocked up, ready to go.


Only the wheel to go.

While I was here, I greased both the tail shaft universal joints and the sliding joint. Although the workshop manual advises greasing every 6000-Miles (10,000km), I opt for a service schedule with twice that frequency. So far, those universal joints have delivered just on 110,000 Miles (177,000km) since being installed during September 2007, and I am happy to say, show no signs of needing replacement anytime soon.

Ron.
 
Hello Ron, I must congratulate you on your excellent pictures and the thorough descriptive accounts you supply. Jolly well done. I have a Christmas wish, Ron to be my next door Neighbour, lol.
 

SydneyRoverP6B

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Hi Max,

I appreciate your feedback. :) I am a very thorough person and I like detail, so writing comprehensively and then providing photos so as to support the text I feel is the best approach. Afterall, a photo (or picture) is worth one thousand words to quote the saying widely attributed to Frederick R. Barnard.

Ron.
 

SydneyRoverP6B

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Hi Brenten,

I have yet to dismantle my Rover's transmission. Main reason being I don't have the necessary tools, and I would want to do it properly. The ideal way to learn would be to watch someone who has the experience and the ability to do the work properly, and then do the same whilst they watch you.

I can't think off the top of my head anything else that I have yet to remove from or replace from either my Rover or one or more others.

Ron.
 

SydneyRoverP6B

Well-Known Member
Staff member
I fitted a nice custom made leather steering wheel cover to my Rover during May. It took me 2.5 hours to lace it on, but the time spent was well worth it.











The quality and fit is superb. The cover was a gift, so apart from the size, I am not privy to any other details.

Ron.
 

SydneyRoverP6B

Well-Known Member
Staff member
I finally allocated the time to refit my front bumper, which had been removed due to damage, as detailed in a post up above.

The repair was very nicely done and the chrome looks great, so all in all I am very pleased. I have yet to refit the overriders, but will detail that procedure in due course.









Ron.
 

SydneyRoverP6B

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Today I refitted the overriders to the front bumper. Between 1988 and 1990 I had purchased a set of NOS overrider bump rubbers and the edge rubbers that form the seal with the bumper, so finally the time had come to put them to work.





This is how it looked before,....




Quite twisted, with splits in both the bumper and the n/s overrider.

This is how it looked now, with both bumper and n/s overrider repaired and rechromed.....


The same n/s overrider that had been split, repaired without trace.




O/S overrider was as it was, so only the rubber parts were changed.

Overall I am very pleased with the quality of the repair and of the chrome, and even better given the cost was covered by the business where the damaged occurred.

Ron.
 

GRTV8

Well-Known Member
Looking nice and shiny and sitting like originals there Ron .
I like your bug catcher . More PC than strapping a kookaburra to the grill to eat the squish !!
Gerald
 

Demetris

Well-Known Member
Ron, it seems that the front end has turned up better than it was before the accident. At least judging from the photos there is nothing to complain about.

But i have a question on the ... bug catcher theme.
Also here it is normal for cars to act like bug catchers in the warm season, especially during high speed cruising at dawn and dusk. But during winter there are no such problems. It seems that nothing is hovering in the cold air. So how come in Australia and you are collecting bugs mid-winter? Or is it because where you live is never cold enough?
 

SydneyRoverP6B

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Hi Demetris,

It does drop to just below zero on some mornings around here, whilst during the day, around 10 to 14 degrees C is fairly normal for Winter. I made up some cold weather covers so as to reduce the volume of air flowing through the radiator, which can be seen on both ends of the grille.

I do still have bugs collecting across the front, although nowhere near as many as I would do during the rest of the year.

Ron.
 

SydneyRoverP6B

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Today quite by chance I touched the throttle link rod that links the two SU carburettors, and it crumbled :shock:

The ends that retain the ball joints are made of plastic, and with all the heat cycles over 41 years, it's time had come!
Fortunately, I did have a NOS rod, but unfortunately it was not the correct one. It had no provision for length adjustment and as it stood, was a touch too long. So for the time being, I have used a short piece of Meccano to link the rod to the carburettor. It works very well I am happy to say, so it can do the job for the time being.


The broken link rod. The NOS part came from the bag beneath, the part number being different to that shown within the parts book.


The NOS rod fitted


A piece of Meccano and a stainless steel bolt, albeit being a tad too long, work well together to keep my Rover on the go.

Ron.
 

unstable load

Well-Known Member
Can't you match up the broken fitting in an aftermarket HEIM JOINT/ROSE JOINT from a local supplier?
They are often used on motorcycles shifters/brake linkages. Also in industry for control cables and rods, here
in SA our local hydraulics supplier carries them, for example.
 
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