My mean green hornet

corazon

Well-Known Member
Good idea, I've seen those peel off in normal road use.
Would be good to see photos of that. I’d not heard of serious failures of them on standard road cars, that’s useful info. I’m guessing they peeled toward bulkhead? I’m not that surprised going by the standard of the factory welds.
 

harveyp6

Well-Known Member
I can't remember which way they peeled tbh, it was a long time ago, and I only ever saw a few. I just remember welding them back on and hoping my welds were better than the ones that failed.
 
I have had the rear shock mount punch completely out of the shell on Jezzabel, my 1964 2000. It was a long time ago and I had no money to fix it properly so welded (using a 12 volt battery and some fencing wire) the whole lot in place until I could get home and fix it properly. 30 years later I still am yet to fix it properly! Pooh Bear will be getting a serious upgrade with a new diff as I am tired of toastin* the inside tyre on roundabouts/ tight tracks. I will beef everything up when I get to that point.
 

corazon

Well-Known Member
The top mount? I’ve been thinking idly for ages about changing that to a T bar style when I fit coilovers, to spread the load more.
Something like this

0609A76A-21C6-4066-B3D8-815F5CE274C0.jpeg
 
Yep. The top shock mount on Jez had no reinforcements so it pushed right out. The shock was still attached but the whole cup arrangement was waggling in the breeze. I am looking to replace the whole rear suspension setup on Pooh with a Jag/Daimler LSD from hub to hub and coil overs. I also have a line on a R33 skyline rear end but I will just have to see how that goes.
 

cobraboy

Well-Known Member
I have been on coil overs for a while now and have been watching that top mount. TBH I am very surprised one pulled out, did you by chance fly the car ?
Looking at that Mustang mount Jim posted I don't see the advantage, you are just changing one tower for another. I was going to add some straps going upward from the stock towers if I noticed anything going awry. Seems good so far, and as I have removed the stock bump stops and rely on the damper rod bump stops the base unit is taking the loading.
 

corazon

Well-Known Member
They’re fairly well welded on my car, one of the better items really.
Guy do you think the bushes had gone and allowed the shock to knock harshly and contribute to the failure?
I just like the look of the other mounting style..
I’m not sure what I’ll do with them to be honest, going to have a further think.

After some cleanup this morning I’ve marked and cut for the other inner sill panel, with its floorpan extensions.

Chassis rail needs to be repaired before sill can go on so I’ll work on that tomorrow.

7E95DE14-7F60-4E88-9B1B-B392E6C5EAD9.jpeg
 
Bushes were fine the whole shock tower (driver side I think, it has been a long time) failed at the point where the tower meets the base unit. It had fractured the whole way around, and was no longer connected to the shell. It had a hard life until I got her, but a lack of reinforcing (as seen on the later cars) seemed to be the issue. I will attempt to get a photo next time I am out at the farm where Jez is being stored pending rebuild.
I have far too many projects building up!
 

quattro

Administrator
Staff member
I had a lower plate rust through on my first P6, so the bottom of the rear shock wasn't connected to anything. The handling was rather bizarre for a while until I worked out what the hell was happening :oops:
 

corazon

Well-Known Member
After spending a week on the steampunk beast referenced in another thread, I had a day off being dirty yesterday :p and got some time in on the Rover today.

To “save time“ I bought boot wall/top link repair panels from wadhams.
Both needed modifying and I ended up discarding the driver side entirely as it was unfit for purpose, and making one from scratch.

48972946-94AC-41F2-B5BF-D424783F1D7B.jpeg

The angle of return flange in context of the pressed ribs is miles off, and ribs are completely different sizes on the same panel!

Here’s mine mocked up

D2B1CCC9-2664-4EFD-A5C9-5B2EE3C72F9F.jpeg

The passenger side was useable but needed some angles tweaking to fit properly.

35F29D77-976E-4829-8159-7AD472E8ED82.jpeg 418988D5-5452-425E-984C-7D5DE7102D6C.jpeg A6FE6682-6C1E-404E-BB13-2ED8C446A7B3.jpeg FFAB614B-83E0-403F-AF81-4492ED335036.jpeg

I’ll be using 6mm plate brackets sandwiching chunkier tubing to reinforce these mounts over stock.

Found some more encapsulated rot under a cover up plate


FAF3D4A1-5C5E-470C-95F9-A1F112A81D9D.jpeg 54739CEA-BE74-454B-8960-92B9C18C5DCA.jpeg

Jim
 

corazon

Well-Known Member
Yes it boggles the mind doesn’t it. I’ll be sending that one back out of principle.
The passenger side is clearly tricky to form but the tricky bit is done quite well. It’s let down by the strengthening rib being too shallow, arguably the easiest bit..plus angles of bends being off
 

cobraboy

Well-Known Member
I can never understand how it would be any more difficult to make and sell a repair panel that fitted rather than one that doesn't.
It's not difficult, you get the repro panel maker to talk to the repro screen rubber guy, and together they have no problem in cocking up !
Bitter moi ?..........
 

harveyp6

Well-Known Member
I always used to make my own, so never had the problem, and I did loads where they were corroded, and lots where they had pulled out altogether, which made for an interesting drive, especially if both had pulled out.
 

corazon

Well-Known Member
These I paid to have welded early on in my ownership after they pulled out, before I learned to weld.
They’d plated inside and out and included liberal amounts of seam sealer. Technically they were still strong but a bit of a mess and I can’t have any trapped rust on this anywhere!
 
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