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Dave3066

Well-Known Member
Do you have a specification or part number for the VW mounts as I will be shortly taking mine off to replace the side plates.?
I 2nd the VW mounts. The good ones (Febi I think is the mfg) are hydraulically filled which does a great job of insulating vibration while making for a good solid mounting. Added to that they won’t be 40+ years old. Used them on my car and they were big improvement.

You want the rear mont (goes above the gearbox) from a Mk. II Golf or Jetta. You have to file off two small tabs on the top surface and you may have to open up the mount hole by 1mm to have them drop in.

Edit: This is the part: FEBI BILSTEIN 02230 Engine Mounting — £9,79
There are a number of posts on the VW mounts if you do a search. Others have also fitted them and have been very happy with the results.

Dave
 

Phil Robson

Well-Known Member
I'm tempted to try these engine mounts despite keeping my 2000 as original as possible (they can always be changed back easily).

Do they make a big difference? I'm sure my car is pretty smooth as it is ;)
 

Phil Robson

Well-Known Member
I now have the re-ground crank back & the engineers have provided some +20 main bearings, but they're for a later car (suffix G on) with an oilway in the middle bearing. Early engines have a plain middle bearing, so I'm going to have to change them.

Whilst waiting for those, can anyone confirm which of the markings on the flywheel is actually 4 deg BTDC? There is TDC and what looks like a 6 deg mark. My question is whether the middle line is the actual 4 deg mark, or the number '4' itself?

IMG_5563.JPG

Sorry if it's a stupid question.....
 

Phil Robson

Well-Known Member
After being a bit under the weather for a while, I've now started to put OCC's engine back together.

You can see the plain main bearing in the middle on these early engines:

IMG_5639.JPG

Hopefully, the various elements that were faulty will translate into a smooth engine! The mains have been reground as they were not quite round, a couple of big end bearings were grooved, meaning the journals have been machined here too. Also, this was what the thrust washers looked like (old one below the new one):

IMG_5640.JPG

I have also renewed the valve springs as well.

Clearly the message is to get everything done whilst you're at it - I should have done this a few years ago.....

Whilst I'm on, does anyone know where I can get new UNF 13/16" Nyloc nuts from for the big end bearing caps? The manual states at point 6 below that they're a special size & I can't find any anywhere!

IMG_5648.JPG
 
Interesting work there.
Just a suggestion, but start a new thread with a more accurate title, in the appropriate section? Folks with no interest in lights may be missing your posts. It might also help anyone searching in the future.
 

quattro

Well-Known Member
Whilst waiting for those, can anyone confirm which of the markings on the flywheel is actually 4 deg BTDC? There is TDC and what looks like a 6 deg mark. My question is whether the middle line is the actual 4 deg mark, or the number '4' itself?

Sorry if it's a stupid question.....
Hi Phil

I don't know but I know how to find out. Measure all the way round the flywheel and then divide by 90. That distance will be the distance from TDC to 4 degrees. Simply divide by 60 to get the 6 degree mark.

Richard
 

cobraboy

Well-Known Member
After being a bit under the weather for a while, I've now started to put OCC's engine back together.

You can see the plain main bearing in the middle on these early engines:

View attachment 13627

Hopefully, the various elements that were faulty will translate into a smooth engine! The mains have been reground as they were not quite round, a couple of big end bearings were grooved, meaning the journals have been machined here too. Also, this was what the thrust washers looked like (old one below the new one):

View attachment 13628

I have also renewed the valve springs as well.

Clearly the message is to get everything done whilst you're at it - I should have done this a few years ago.....

Whilst I'm on, does anyone know where I can get new UNF 13/16" Nyloc nuts from for the big end bearing caps? The manual states at point 6 below that they're a special size & I can't find any anywhere!

View attachment 13629
I am staggered that a big end bolt has a thread of 13/16"
That has got to be a miss print - come on that is steam engine sizing !
 

cobraboy

Well-Known Member
Not wanting to pee on your fireworks, but I don't think an ordinary nyloc nut will be up to snuff.
I cannot recall seeing a nyloc on a big end ever, but I am receptive to being educated.
 

harveyp6

Well-Known Member
I've reused the big end nuts every time I've replaced shells, or done any other work that required removing them, and at the time I had no idea how many times, if ever, they had been removed before, and I never had any problems with them afterwards.
 

Phil Robson

Well-Known Member
Interesting work there.
Just a suggestion, but start a new thread with a more accurate title, in the appropriate section? Folks with no interest in lights may be missing your posts. It might also help anyone searching in the future.
Is it possible to change the thread's title? Some members seem to have done so before.
 

Phil Robson

Well-Known Member
The concensus was to measure the journals to see how bad they were & then decide whether or not to remove the engine. As I was also concerned about having issues with the early gear linkage when I potentially put the unit back in the car, Ian suggested trying to remove the engine without the gearbox.

It may be a bit harder to get the engine back in, but there's plenty of room, so we'll see when the time comes.
This is proving a bit difficult...:( Does anyone have any top tips? I used a clutch alignment tool so I'm pretty sure that's correct.
 

harveyp6

Well-Known Member
If you mean getting the engine and clutch back on to the front of the gearbox, then all you can do is if you're sure the clutch is aligned properly, equalize the gap between the bellhousing and the engine bearer plate all the way around, top and bottom, side to side, and when you have, make sure the gearbox is in gear, with the handbrake on, then simultaneously jiggle the engine backwards while turning the crank. Once it enters the splines it should slide into the spigot quite easily. You're lucky it's a course spline, fine is a lot harder, but TBH it is a fiddle, and that's the reason I rarely do it that way.
 
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