I had to fit a new oil pressure sender, and it worked for one whole day! Groan.

mrtask

Well-Known Member
#1
I fitted a new aftermarket oil pressure sender the other day, and was pleased to see a nice healthy reading. The smile was wiped off my face a whole day later, when the gauge read 0 again. Gulp! A took a quick peek to see if the wire had become dislodged, only to see oil weeping out of the top of the new sender. Where only electrickery should be emerging.
The nice lady who answered the phone at Rimmer Bros this afternoon said she'll pop another one in the post free of charge, much to her credit.
I'd had to go and buy a 32mm socket to fit it, and had joked that I wouldn't need to use it again until the new sender failed. Guess I spoke too soon. Rolls eyes.
 

mrtask

Well-Known Member
#4
The previous owner of my car fitted the engine with an SD1 timing cover and oil pump, so I need to use an SD1 sender. I bet the P6 sender isn't a metric size. Whenever I see those little blue boxes I know they're Britpart = Shitpart, but this last particular item has set a new low. Unfortunately the OEM quality part is not currently available. I'll fit the replacement tomorrow, and hope it lasts a little longer. :rolleyes:
 

clive P62

Active Member
#5
The previous owner of my car fitted the engine with an SD1 timing cover and oil pump, so I need to use an SD1 sender. I bet the P6 sender isn't a metric size. Whenever I see those little blue boxes I know they're Britpart = Shitpart, but this last particular item has set a new low. Unfortunately the OEM quality part is not currently available. I'll fit the replacement tomorrow, and hope it lasts a little longer. :rolleyes:
SD1 and P6 Have the same threads.
I've tryed SD1 senders in P6s in the past but they are not compatible with the P6 gauge .
 

Quagmire

Active Member
#6
It's not just britpart, I had a bearmach pressure switch (not sender) go the same way on my Defender, leaking out where the terminal exited the body- it made quite an oily mess!
 

PeterZRH

Well-Known Member
#7
I got mine from Colin. I hasn't leaked after 2 years and works fine. Ask him. they are not cheap but there do not seem to be viable alternatives.
 
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mrtask

Well-Known Member
#8
So I fitted the free replacement sender Rimmer sent me when I complained. And ... it did the same again! Functioned for a day, spewed oil all over the front crossmember, rad, lower rad hose, valance, garage floor, petrol station forecourt, everywhere I parked all day, etc. Most embarrassing. I think I can now conclusively call these cheap parts from Rimmer Bros a steaming pile of poo. I've ordered the J R Wadhams part, which at £74.- incl. postage and VAT as opposed to £32,- for the useless leaky ones, should hopefully last two days. ??? Ho hum. I'll report back on whether it leaks more precious fluids once I've fitted the proper part!
 

4cwb

New Member
#9
I bought the same from wadhams last year , it would not work they refused to give me my money back.It took me months to get it back the woman at wadhams said that I had broken it.You can repair them i have done two of them.
 

PeterZRH

Well-Known Member
#10
I bought the same from wadhams last year , it would not work they refused to give me my money back.It took me months to get it back the woman at wadhams said that I had broken it.You can repair them i have done two of them.
This is why everyone I've spoken too absolutely hates dealing with them.
 

SydneyRoverP6B

Well-Known Member
Staff member
#11
The images depict two oil pressure transmitters. Figure 1 is the standard replacement. I have used two of these in the past, the first leaked oil between the interface of the plastic and metal sections within a day of fitting. I returned it to T.R. Spares in Sydney and they replaced it under warranty, no question. Scott was not at all surprised to hear it was leaking oil. The second did the same, leaked oil within a day or so of fitting. Neither read correctly either, the first over read, the second under read. I had removed the original Smiths sender which at the time was 34 years of age as it was starting to fail, the gauge falling to zero on slowing down, then while idling it would come back up. Regardless it worked better than the aftermarket items, so I refitted it till I could buy genuine Smiths senders.

Figure 2 is of a genuine Smiths sender. There were also replacements for the Smiths senders originally made in Wales, but later I think made in the USA. They look identical save for the 'R' stamped on the body of the sender. I have not used one of those as yet so I cannot comment on functionality. They were stamped PTR1812/06.

DRC2479B.jpg
Figure 1 - Aftermarket sender.

s-l640 (1).jpg
Figure 2 - Genuine NOS Smiths Oil Pressure Transmitter (an example only)

I managed to source a genine NOS item a few months later, fitting it on October 07, 2008. The Green Smiths box that housed the sender was date stamped 20 Aug, 1971. Since fitting, to date it has covered 192,332 Miles (310,000km). It works perfectly and does not leak oil. The sender is stamped PT1812/06.

Ron.
 

mrtask

Well-Known Member
#12
I received my reproduction oil pressure transmitter from Wadhams the week before Christmas, and fitted it straight away. I'm delighted to report that it does the job properly, and doesn't disgorge engine oil. My missus had gifted me with small sets of 'stubby' imperial and metric spanners as an early Xmas present, which made the task of swapping the useless leaky sender for the proper pattern part an absolute doddle. I wish I'd had some stubbies sooner, they're soooo much easier in confined spaces than the unwieldy long spanners which were all I had previously. Anyway, now my engine oil pressure isn't reading as remarkably high as the two cheap and leaky transmitters had indicated, but it isn't that bad. I've been less than complimentary about Wadhams once or twice in the past, but I suppose we should be grateful that they remanufacture parts, so I give them the credit they deserve.
 

PeterZRH

Well-Known Member
#13
Interesting what do you get? I get about 15-20 at an idle of 600rpm and cruising at 1500 this sits around 30psi. No idea how accurate. It only really goes high when cold. Mine is a 180,000km (120,000 mile) engine.
 

mrtask

Well-Known Member
#14
Middle of the dial after a cold start, dropping to about 15, 20 or so when warm and stop-starting around town. If I actually manage to engage fifth gear on an open road sometime soon I'll report back what it reads at higher speeds than I ever reach around London. Without digging around to unearth the old paperwork from the previous owner, all I know is the odometer is on its second rondo, but I'm going to hazard a guess that the engine has done at least 60,000 miles since the guy I bought it from rebuilt it. 50,000 of them with me at the wheel.
 

PeterZRH

Well-Known Member
#15
I think these instruments really only have value in seeing any drop-off over time. In absolute measurement I doubt there are anywhere near.
 

mrtask

Well-Known Member
#16
You're probably right, Peter!
I went out for a short jaunt into the countryside this morning, given the bright sunshine. Nice to blat about some country lanes a bit, rather than my normal suburban or inner city stop-start driving. Cruising back down the motorway towards London I was heartened to see the oil pressure reading 40lb at 70mph. I notice a distinct difference in the sounds the engine makes!? With my preferred tipple, Shell Super+ in the tank it sounds crisper, but after topping up with some BP E5 97 octane juice the engine note became deeper and the acceleration seemed just a mite less brisk. Perhaps it is just my vivid imagination.
 
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