HOW MUCH!!! Prototype V8?

ghce

Well-Known Member
#2
Series 2 dash?.....52K hmmm I think not. Were it as in 1966, 67 68 maybe but it aint, you cant help wonder whats else has been lost in A: the intervening years and B: the restoration.
 

ghce

Well-Known Member
#4
I presume this is the one where the only original items are the chassis tags and the gullibility of potential purchases
 

PeterZRH

Well-Known Member
#6
The owner of this car is well known. Let's assume it is worth it for the reasons given. What exactly do you do with it that you couldn't really get out of a £10-15k car?
 

ghce

Well-Known Member
#9
I can absolutely understand the 52K asking were it an original car and it would be good value at this price.
 

chrisw

Well-Known Member
#13
Come on Chris, spill the beans. What do you know? :)
Everything. I was the one told about it.. I passed on buying it due to too many projects. I know the history, I've been involved in the restoration, and we have loads of pictures from Gaydon showing how it was used for development and testing.

It's been restored exceedingly well, and to a high degree. The history of the car is second to none. This isn't some ringer with an original chassis number attached - as some have intimated elsewhere.
 

quattro

Administrator
Staff member
#14
Nice one Chris.

I do like these development cars.

Did the original have the series two clocks and switches?

And what are the air vents, an idea which was never followed through, or an addition during the restoration?

Richard
 

PeterZRH

Well-Known Member
#15
Everything. I was the one told about it.. I passed on buying it due to too many projects. I know the history, I've been involved in the restoration, and we have loads of pictures from Gaydon showing how it was used for development and testing.

It's been restored exceedingly well, and to a high degree. The history of the car is second to none. This isn't some ringer with an original chassis number attached - as some have intimated elsewhere.
agreed. it's a lovely car I read about it a lot on Facebook. i just hope it finds the right owner. or indeed if there is a "right owner" other than the person who had it restored. P6s are pretty niche and prototypes at that end of the market are an infinitesimally small niche. I suppose technically I'd be one of the select market but I just don't want the liability TBH, I like my car as a development mule/hack. Are the clear indicators original. small point but they jar visually to me like a modern update.
 

chrisw

Well-Known Member
#16
Did the original have the series two clocks and switches?

And what are the air vents, an idea which was never followed through, or an addition during the restoration?
When it was converted to LHD in order to undergo testing in North America, it was fitted with the round dash, and switches, previously seen on the 2000S mock-up.

The air vents are part of the original a/c system. They never made it into production.

Again, pictures from Gaydon (b&w), and from the Rover engineer who drove her (colour)

Are the clear indicators original. small point but they jar visually to me like a modern update.
Original from the LHD conversion. Colour pictures prove this is correct.
 

ghce

Well-Known Member
#17
When it was converted to LHD in order to undergo testing in North America, it was fitted with the round dash, and switches, previously seen on the 2000S mock-up.

The air vents are part of the original a/c system. They never made it into production.

Again, pictures from Gaydon (b&w), and from the Rover engineer who drove her (colour)



Original from the LHD conversion. Colour pictures prove this is correct.
Well that puts a completely different complexion on it indeed, wow round gauges back in 66 ( or whilst still a development mule)I would therefore agree that the price asked is actually quite reasonable.

Graeme
 

keynsham1

Active Member
#18
I think for me and I was to buy a prototype for this sort of money, it would have to be something special. This car is interesting and I am sure has a fantastic history, but at the end of the day, it looks like any other P6. In a show you would walk right past it. Now if it were a Graber coupe, or a factory convertible, or an original slanty nose gas turbine car, then I see the value. Not for this one though I am afraid. It just isn't different enough for me to be worth so much more than a standard production model.
 

ghce

Well-Known Member
#19
I think for me and I was to buy a prototype for this sort of money, it would have to be something special. This car is interesting and I am sure has a fantastic history, but at the end of the day, it looks like any other P6. In a show you would walk right past it. Now if it were a Graber coupe, or a factory convertible, or an original slanty nose gas turbine car, then I see the value. Not for this one though I am afraid. It just isn't different enough for me to be worth so much more than a standard production model.
I think for your mentioned cars there would be a doubling if not more in price even up to a factor of 10 I suspect.
 

chrisw

Well-Known Member
#20
I think for your mentioned cars there would be a doubling if not more in price even up to a factor of 10 I suspect.
All depends on the condition.

There are several Grabers out there, ranging from in-restoration to restored. You're potentially looking at £30-80k, depending on condition
The P6 convertible is probably worth around the £30-40k mark. Older restoration, but has had work completed over the years
T4 is probably valued at around £250k
The P6 racer is around £100-150k

As with any car, it depends on your point of view. Some people like having cars that stand out, others prefer the subtle approach.

Either way, your average P6 owner really isn't the intended audience for an expensive P6.
 
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