Filling the P6 with fuel

#1
Since buying the car on around half a tank of fuel and breaking down due to debris / rust coming through (leading to tank removal and carb rebuild) i like to keep the tank full

The previous owner did warn me that if you stick the fuel niozzle all in it will click continuously. Which it does

I found i could rest the nozzle on one of the little metal 'rings' sticking out into the fuel filler pipe and it flows without clicking

When filling i'm not really sure if i am getting as much in as i can

The fuel seems to sort of bubble up to the nozzle, make it click, and then seems to drain down again

Is there an overflow pipe?

Can it be brimmed to the cap?
 
#2
The fuel filler has two pipes, one inside the other in a coaxial arrangement. You put the fuel down the central pipe and it vents through the outer pipe when you are filling it.

Assuming the car has not been apart and the inner pipe discarded, as it's a pain to install.

You can fill to the brim, but inside the trunk the fuel filler assembly has two rubber hoses which often seep, so with the fuel level above them when filled to the brim you'll get a fuel smell & possibly liquid fuel in the trunk.

Yours
Vern
 

sdibbers

Well-Known Member
#3
I've found the same, partially insert nozzle, angle handle towards rear windscreen. Only use about 60% of flow or it backs up and stops the pump. The problem arises with newer pumps with vapour recovery systems. They have a collar that needs to be depressed to allow the pump to function. I have taken to hooking it on the latch of the cap, but worry about damaging it.
 

SydneyRoverP6B

Well-Known Member
Staff member
#4
Hello Jim,

There is an overflow pipe on the Australian market cars, not sure if that applied to all markets. The exit is on the underside proximal to the tank outlet. On hot days with a full tank, I have seen both on my Rover and on others, fuel pouring from the overflow. It can be quite disconcerting when parked in a shopping centre and all this fuel is pouring out. :oops: I don't know what volume exactly, but enough to run down into the gutter.

Ron.
 

harveyp6

Well-Known Member
#5
On hot days with a full tank, I have seen both on my Rover and on others, fuel pouring from the overflow. It can be quite disconcerting when parked in a shopping centre and all this fuel is pouring out. :oops: I don't know what volume exactly, but enough to run down into the gutter.
I've had that happen. It was parked with the passenger side next to the kerb, and the camber set it flowing so I turned the car around and it stopped.
 

jp928

Well-Known Member
#6
Just so you know Harvey, in Oz if you park on the wrong side of the road (very common in UK in my experience there)you can be booked for having your 'nearside' wheels more than 10" from the kerb. Probably 250mm now. Logic is that you have to drive on wrong side to park, and to leave. Only legal in one way streets where its marks as 'park on both sides'.
 

harveyp6

Well-Known Member
#7
, in Oz if you park on the wrong side of the road (very common in UK in my experience there)you can be booked for having your 'nearside' wheels more than 10" from the kerb. Probably 250mm now. Logic is that you have to drive on wrong side to park, and to leave. Only legal in one way streets where its marks as 'park on both sides'.
You can be done for the same thing in the UK, as you would be facing in the opposite direction to the flow of traffic, but it's rarely enforced.
 
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