Etha-guard classic E5 E10 petrol.

sdibbers

Well-Known Member
#2
I believe it’s a stabiliser. Used to stop ethanol forming varnish if left in a tank over winter. Ethanol based fuels have a tendency to absorb water which causes them to break down over time. This is meant to reduce that.
The other issues of ethanol is that it attacks old rubber fuel lines and seals isn’t fixed by this additive.
 

mrtask

Well-Known Member
#3
Can't comment on Etha-Guard, but I will remark that as I was filling up today I noticed that the rubber seal between my filler cap and the rear scuttle panel has swelled up in lots of little lumps, which look like barnacles on a boat. Hadn't noticed that before today. Izzat coz of the ethanol in the fuel?
 

sdibbers

Well-Known Member
#4
Can't comment on Etha-Guard, but I will remark that as I was filling up today I noticed that the rubber seal between my filler cap and the rear scuttle panel has swelled up in lots of little lumps, which look like barnacles on a boat. Hadn't noticed that before today. Izzat coz of the ethanol in the fuel?
It’s a possibility. I did notice that rubber swells and goes gummy when exposed to E10 fuel.
 
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#5
there is a very readable Wiki (pedia) article under I think "Fuel Additives" That discusses the good and bad points of both ethanol and methanol. It also provides some insight into the why and how and the fixes used.
M
 
#6
drained off my tank 2 years ago to work on return line ( check it was clear etc) and next day when I checked container of fuel ( about 6 galls or so) I noticed a clear defining line of fluid. upper half very clear .lower a bit opaque . realised lower half was water mix with fuel! so I remove supper half and got rid of contaminated fuel ( not down drains !) .I use additive stabiliser now and had tank lined to prevent rust and corrosion before refilling.
 

colnerov

Well-Known Member
#7
Hi, Methylated spirits is miscible, so put in the fuel tank to soak up the water which will then be burnt with the fuel in the engine.

Colin
 
#8
No.
Household meths is ethanol with around 10% added methanol (plus dye, pyridine and various other assorted nasties which make it undrinkable and toxic) so whilst enough of it will redissolve all of the wet seperated ethanol layer you'll have to then get it all out straight away by draining or driving - if you leave it, the added ethanol makes the fuel both more aggressive in attacking rubber and quicker to suck even more moisture into the fuel.
Don't breathe the exhaust fumes either.
 
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