Engine mounts (4-cyl)

#21
Fantastic upgrade!! I have been frustrated by worn engine mounts for the last couple of years, the situation is now so bad the engine almost jumps from the bonnet on firing up!, not to mention a very annoying tapping on the gearbox tunnel while the engine starts. After a quick word with Demetris I cant wait to try this!!
 

sdibbers

Well-Known Member
#23
Hey Demitrius,

I think I have the same problem on my car with mounts and reversed brackets. Could you let me know if the VW Golf gearbox mounts were for an automatic or manual diesel model?

Thanks,

Steven
 

sdibbers

Well-Known Member
#25
Great news! I've found a US based VW specialist that stocks them and has a handy application list. Seems they were used on all Golfs and Jettas from 85-92 wuth manual or auto gearboxes and petrol or diesel engines. Strangely enough I had an 87 Golf and replaced that exact mount years ago and never made the connection (duh!). To be fair I think it was before I owned my 2000TC
 

sdibbers

Well-Known Member
#26
Great news! I've found a US based VW specialist that stocks them and has a handy application list. Seems they were used on all Golfs and Jettas from 85-92 wuth manual or auto gearboxes and petrol or diesel engines. Strangely enough I had an 87 Golf and replaced that exact mount years ago and never made the connection (duh!). To be fair I think it was before I owned my 2000TC.

Linky: http://www.partsplaceinc.com/products/p ... 2&sku=9216
 
#27
FULL MARKS TO DEMETRIS !!!!!!!!!!!!!

THIS IS A SPOT ON MODIFICATION

DISADVANTAGES ........................ no ,sorry, stuck on that one!

ADVANTAGES

1 Cheap parts to buy (£30 a pair delivered)
2 Very easy to fit
3 Once done much easier to fit and remove (no need to lock the awkward to reach bottom engine mount nut whilts undoing the top one) Mod has threaded insert- one top bolt only.
4 You cant get the origionals and
5 Why would you want to , these mounts are far superior (in my opinion)
6 No engine noise/vibration transmission, if it were not for my sports stainless it would be very hard to tell if the engine is still running at the lights!

THERE IS NO REASON WHATSOEVER NOT TO DO THIS, TREAT YOURSELVES!!!!!!!

BIG THANKS AGAIN TO DEMETRIS
 

Barten

Active Member
#29
Very good new for "smoothing" the four cylinder cars it seems. Well done Demetris! I am just wondering if these mount can be used on a 1965 2000 also? If thats the case I better order 2 for the future restoration.
regards, Barten
 

Demetris

Well-Known Member
#30
Thanks, i think that i was just lucky to spot the compatibility.

Barten, i don't see why these mountings could not be fitted into an early car. As far as i know the design of the 4 cyl mounting did not change through the years.
 
#32
I've just done the same job on my 2200SC. I obtained my mounts from GSF. I found that I had to remove the exhaust manifold to gain access to the left-hand mounting and 65mm was too long as the bolts bottomed. Also the unthreaded shank of the bolt was too long. Perhaps setscrews should be used instead. I have to say, though, that I haven't experienced the same improvement that others have. The vibration is very harsh when first started from cold, although it gets better as the engine warms up, presumably the rubber is more compliant when it's warm, but even then it's no better than the originals.
 
#33
suffolkpete said:
I've just done the same job on my 2200SC. I obtained my mounts from GSF. I found that I had to remove the exhaust manifold to gain access to the left-hand mounting and 65mm was too long as the bolts bottomed. Also the unthreaded shank of the bolt was too long. Perhaps setscrews should be used instead. I have to say, though, that I haven't experienced the same improvement that others have. The vibration is very harsh when first started from cold, although it gets better as the engine warms up, presumably the rubber is more compliant when it's warm, but even then it's no better than the originals.
Something odd there then. I put a set in, 70 mm bolts worked fine and there is very definitely a improvement. Perhaps it is the unthreaded portion that was the problem on the bolt length.

Comparing the two running TCs I have at idle, there is a visible vibration to the dash with the old mounts that is absent on the car with new mounts.

Yours
Vern
 

Demetris

Well-Known Member
#34
I also think that something is wrong there.
Do your new mounts look like this?


Perhaps it is a pattern part and your bolts are bottoming out. Try to undo them one turn and see if it makes any difference.
Did you align the engine after fitting the mounts?
 
#36
Yes the mounts do look like that and they are probably pattern parts. They were bottoming out, but I cut 5mm off which appeared to cure the problem. I'm not sure what you mean by "align the engine". It seems to sit slightly higher than previously and I had to tighten the rear spring mount down quite a lot to get the bar to sit in the middle of the snub rubber. On the front mounting, the inner nuts have been welded to the threaded rod so the only adjustment available is the slotted holes in the mounting bracket and the full adjustment has been taken up. I did the snub rubber first and then tightened the front stay brackets.
 
#37
That sounds like the problem then.

You should start by completely slackening the stay bar. If the welded nuts stop you doing that, it's time to get another one! Then align the engine so that the gearbox mount is central and the springs etc vertical. Adjust these to the book, then go back to the stay bar and set it so thatthe rubbers are either side of the neutral point. ie not clamped at all. Then just add a very slight tweak.

Chris
 

Demetris

Well-Known Member
#38
Perhaps your mounts require even shorter bolts.
Take care to follow the procedure that Chris describes above, by having the mounts loose both from their base unit bolts, and the engine bracket bolts, and also having the exhaust joints loose. Once you are happy that engine / box are sitting straight without straining the mounts, start by tightening the mount to base unit bolts, then the big bracket to mount bolts, carefully not to strain the rubber. Check the alignment of the gearbox tail again, and if it's still OK, adjust and tighten the front engine steady. You should leave the exhaust joints last. It sounds complicated but it is essential, and it is actually the procedure described in the factory manual for the alignment of the engine / gearbox.
 
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