Compressed air brake bleeder

#1
Product: Lone Wolf Brake Bleeding System
1 liter plastic bottle. Clear plastic tube with a rubber head that fits over the brake bleed nipple. The bottle is fitted with a screw top featuring a venturi tube, trigger and air hose attachment [akin to a spray gun in overall appearance].

Operation:
Fit rubber head on bleed nipple. Attach bottle to air supply. Crack open the nipple and squeeze the trigger. A venturi vacuum is created across the top of the bottle drawing brake fluid from the system and depositing it in bottle. The clear tubing shows when no more air bubbles are emerging with the brake fluid.

Hints:
1. Using maximum air pressure was necessary to draw the brake fluid strongly from the system.
2. The rubber head was too tight [given restricted access] to get it onto a P6 rear nipple, so the head was removed and a short length of plastic tubing substituted.

Pros:
1. One man brake bleeding: very fast and incredibly effective.
2. No brake pumping.
3. No risk of munting master cylinder seals on rough, unused parts of the cylinder [cf. 2 above].
4. No mess - all brake fluid is completely contained in a sealed bottle.
5. Solid construction - should give years of service.
6. Works off medium-capacity home garage air compressor.

Cons:
1. Kit contained no instruction manual.
2. Air hose attachment supplied was only one of the two standard sizes - you may have to buy the alternative.
3. Expensive for what it is - but that is probably more retail mark up on a slow selling specialty item than anything else.
4. The odd brake nipple may be one of those that give no fluid when moderately loose, so loosening them wide allows air to be drawn in around the threads when the trigger is operated thus giving a false impression. [Not serious since the huge quantities of air bubbles still coming out after 30+ seconds of bleeding is a dead giveaway.]

Overall:
Test vehicle 1969 2000 P6. Highly recommended - wish I'd bought one years ago. Probably what the pros use in a busy small workshop.
 
#7
I don't think it will matter too much Dave, as you'll only be using it in short bursts the air in the tank should be enough, allowing the compressor to recharge between blasts.
 
#8
webmaster said:
I don't think it will matter too much Dave, as you'll only be using it in short bursts the air in the tank should be enough, allowing the compressor to recharge between blasts.
100%. I let the air tank fill and the compressor kicked in very briefly only once or twice during the process thereafter.
 
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