Carb Removal TC

#1
I'm sorry if this is already posted, I can't find it. and I don't have a manual.

I'm trying to get my carbs off, to get to the manifold and exhaust gaskets which need replacing. and further inspection. Is there a procedure?

Strange that the nuts don't clear the carbs. and I have one missing underneath. I'd appreciate any guidance.
 

Demetris

Well-Known Member
#2
The carbs are removed from the engine complete with the inlet manifold.
You have to drain the coolant, disconnect throttle and choke, as well as heater hoses, undo the 6 (IIRC...) inlet manifold nuts, and lift out the manifold together with the carbs. After that the exhaust manifold will be obvious and easy enough.
 

sdibbers

Well-Known Member
#5
Thank you both gentlemen!!

Chris, what's the "official" Manual? I see there's a few out there!
Hi Brian, There's a couple of ways of getting the official manual. One of the owner's clubs have digitised the manual and have it on CD-Rom. The other is Ebay. Here's one for a reasonable GBP16.00 ROVER 2000 FULL WORKSHOP MANUAL PLUS SUPPLEMENTS | eBay

The factory manual is worth seeking out as its very detailed and well illustrated. In fact its better than most modern factory manuals!
 
#6
Hi Brian, There's a couple of ways of getting the official manual. One of the owner's clubs have digitised the manual and have it on CD-Rom. The other is Ebay. Here's one for a reasonable GBP16.00 ROVER 2000 FULL WORKSHOP MANUAL PLUS SUPPLEMENTS | eBay

The factory manual is worth seeking out as its very detailed and well illustrated. In fact its better than most modern factory manuals!
Thanks S

+£20 for postage to Ireland. I'm afraid. And thanks for the reminder about the digitised one. I must sort that tonight. Been working on it solid since I got it, I need to start enjoying it too.
 

chrisw

Well-Known Member
#7
Hi Brian, There's a couple of ways of getting the official manual. One of the owner's clubs have digitised the manual and have it on CD-Rom. The other is Ebay. Here's one for a reasonable GBP16.00 ROVER 2000 FULL WORKSHOP MANUAL PLUS SUPPLEMENTS | eBay

The factory manual is worth seeking out as its very detailed and well illustrated. In fact its better than most modern factory manuals!
Except one of the supplements is for an SD1

The best workshop manual for a series 1 4-pot is 605028. One of many on ebay Rover 2000 Workshop Manual 605028 | eBay
 
#8
I moved a couple of pipes, and with the exception of the throttle cable, choke cable and servo pipe, I was able to take the manifold off to get at the gaskets...gasket. All the nuts were no more than finger tight, I got to them with a small ratchet spanner and me fingers. Put a basin underneath caught the spill, no need to drain the fluid completely. I will get it off proper and give it a good inspection and cleaning.
 

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sdibbers

Well-Known Member
#9
Put a basin underneath caught the spill, no need to drain the fluid completely”
Be aware that if the coolant isn’t drain sufficiently it can run down the intakes into the cylinders, I’ve made that mistake in the past.
 
#10
Fortunatley then I took care, I undid the bolts slowly, and let it dribble out, and I dried around quickly, there was very little wet.. AND one of the coolant channels was dry, so maybe a problem there!
 
#11
I got the exhaust manifold off today, one of the copper gaskets was pretty bad. After removal I noticed that the deck was a bit "burry" and bumpy along the edges, and around the drill holes and not entirely flat, not badly, but enough to raise an eyebrow. Just a little something to look out for.

So I gave it a bit of a sanding ready for new ones. It feels much better.
 

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#12
The copper rings do all the sealing and are quite forgiving, so as long as the deck isn't shaped like a banana its finish doesn't matter.

But then again you've got it apart because it was leaking.

Yours
Vern
 
#13
The copper rings do all the sealing and are quite forgiving, so as long as the deck isn't shaped like a banana its finish doesn't matter.

But then again you've got it apart because it was leaking.

Yours
Vern
I was just about to get to that Vern, I have a question about the gaskets. Aren't the decks being pulled out of shape by that gasket arrangement? I'm not surprised they go Banana shaped. I was about to ask if an annealed copper gasket would be better suited along the entire deck? Those little ones seem a bit cost-cutty. Oh and I tidied it up further anyway!
 

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sdibbers

Well-Known Member
#14
'm not surprised they go Banana shaped.
Has the Manifold been repaired in the past? TC manifolds have a tendency to crak and if not held flat during welding they can warp the plate.

I was about to ask if an annealed copper gasket would be better suited along the entire deck?
In my experience the copper washer sty;e gaskets work well (they're filled with asbestos rope to help the seal) and they seat nicely into the counter bores of the head. I'm not sure the bolt pattern would work well cinching down the plate and sealing the gasket.
 
#15
Has the Manifold been repaired in the past? TC manifolds have a tendency to crak and if not held flat during welding they can warp the plate.


In my experience the copper washer sty;e gaskets work well (they're filled with asbestos rope to help the seal) and they seat nicely into the counter bores of the head. I'm not sure the bolt pattern would work well cinching down the plate and sealing the gasket.
No warping or welding repairs, Remarkably good nick. My banana comment was in reply to Vern.

Yes I thought about that sdibbers. If you look at the above photo, the gaskets in worst shape were 1 & 4, where there are only two bolts, I only have basic engineering, but it was always going to blow there IMO. But like you say the counterbores seal the deal. I'll stick with the little ones and make sure the bolts are torqued up properly.
 
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#16
The filled copper rings are a very effective sealing solution, and quite common on all sorts of applications where you have a high temperature swing in operation. For example, many motorcycles use the arrangement for their headers.

The theory of operation is that the rings have a thin seal surface, and combined with the ductility of the copper (the heat of the exhaust tends to keep them from work hardening) means that the clamping force stays high even with the expansion & contraction.

I'd guess, judging from your comment about the intake manifold nuts being finger tight, that that header has been on & off the car several times without replacing the rings and that's the root cause of the one ring failing.

Yours
Vern
 
#17
The filled copper rings are a very effective sealing solution, and quite common on all sorts of applications where you have a high temperature swing in operation. For example, many motorcycles use the arrangement for their headers.

The theory of operation is that the rings have a thin seal surface, and combined with the ductility of the copper (the heat of the exhaust tends to keep them from work hardening) means that the clamping force stays high even with the expansion & contraction.

I'd guess, judging from your comment about the intake manifold nuts being finger tight, that that header has been on & off the car several times without replacing the rings and that's the root cause of the one ring failing.

Yours
Vern
Vern, my thoughts exactly. Thanks for your input. Much appreciated.
 
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