BW35/65 Checklist.

harveyp6

Well-Known Member
#1
Firstly check that the selector linkage is correctly adjusted and is working as it should.

Then check the fluid level as follows:

With the transmission at normal working temperature, the engine idling, and the car on level ground, run through the entire selector range allowing a few seconds in each position to allow it to engage, starting and finishing in PARK, then, with the engine still running walk round remove and wipe clean the dipstick and re-insert to take a level. You will have time for a few quick dips to try and get an accurate level. If you add fluid repeat the whole procedure before taking another level. Use only ATF-G or fluid that meets Ford spec. M2C-33G. DON'T use any of the DEXRON type fluids. A small amount of white blackboard chalk rubbed on the bottom of the dipstick, and then wiped off, dries it and makes seeing the level easier.

The fluid should be red and clean, not brown and burnt.

Check the condition of the throttle bracket bush if fitted.

Check the condition and adjustment of the kickdown cable.
 
#4
harveyp6 said:
Firstly check that the selector linkage is correctly adjusted and is working as it should.

Then check the fluid level as follows:

With the transmission at normal working temperature, the engine idling, and the car on level ground, run through the entire selector range allowing a few seconds in each position to allow it to engage, starting and finishing in PARK, then, with the engine still running walk round remove and wipe clean the dipstick and re-insert to take a level. You will have time for a few quick dips to try and get an accurate level. If you add fluid repeat the whole procedure before taking another level. Use only ATF-G or fluid that meets Ford spec. M2C-33G. DON'T use any of the DEXRON type fluids. A small amount of white blackboard chalk rubbed on the bottom of the dipstick, and then wiped off, dries it and makes seeing the level easier.
Just a question, harvey, My Rover repair operation manual says to do the above, but to turn off the engine before checking the level, does this make any difference?
 

harveyp6

Well-Known Member
#5
V8P6B said:
Just a question, harvey, My Rover repair operation manual says to do the above, but to turn off the engine before checking the level, does this make any difference?
Yes it does make a difference, and the book is wrong. IIRC If you read it where you have (where it says to switch off,-cant remember if that's in the gearbox or the specification section) if you go to the other section, it says to do it running.
 
#7
Harveys right you should check the level when the engine is running :D
I check my ford prefect street rod zf 4 hp 22 this way and I have no problems but dont over fill
 

harveyp6

Well-Known Member
#9
lukewilliam1_75 said:
Can over filling cause a leak?
Yes, in the same way as they leak if the converter drains back into the box so raising the level when the cars are left standing, and they will also blow the excess out of the breather in use.
 
#12
harveyp6 said:
Firstly check that the selector linkage is correctly adjusted and is working as it should.

Then check the fluid level as follows:

With the transmission at normal working temperature, the engine idling, and the car on level ground, run through the entire selector range allowing a few seconds in each position to allow it to engage, starting and finishing in PARK, then, with the engine still running walk round remove and wipe clean the dipstick and re-insert to take a level. You will have time for a few quick dips to try and get an accurate level. If you add fluid repeat the whole procedure before taking another level. Use only ATF-G or fluid that meets Ford spec. M2C-33G. DON'T use any of the DEXRON type fluids. A small amount of white blackboard chalk rubbed on the bottom of the dipstick, and then wiped off, dries it and makes seeing the level easier.

The fluid should be red and clean, not brown and burnt.

Check the condition of the throttle bracket bush if fitted.

Check the condition and adjustment of the kickdown cable.
It says in my Workshop Manual that the fluid has to meet Ford Spec SQM-2C-9010A - and that would be Dextron II.
 
#14
harveyp6 said:
I've never seen that, and if it is the case then the book is wrong. (Again.)
Actually, it says Castrol TQF. And then: "Castrol TQF is an automatic transmission fluid specially designed to meet the requirements of the Ford Specification SQM-2C-9010A". It's probably this sentence where they got it wrong, since Castrol TQF is "Anti-wear, automatic transmission fluid for Ford and Borg Warner applications where specified " according to the Castrol UK website. So TQF could be correct for the Rover, but it doesn't meet Ford Specification SQM-2C-9010A as the book says. That's a really bad thing, since if you search for ATF meeting Ford Specification SQM-2C-9010A, you do end up with Dextron II.

If it wasn't for you and therefore this thread, I'd have put Dextron II in my gearbox!

Same goes for checking the level. It says "Check Cold" on the dipstick. The book says check cold with engine not running. I had my doubts about that anyway, since I have never heard of an automatic where you check the fluid level when cold and with the engine not running, and I had my share of automatics in my life.
 

harveyp6

Well-Known Member
#15
I've just checked my book and it lists TQF, but no mention of the other specification at all. If you actually trawl through the factory WM it tells you to check the level in two different ways, in two different sections, and they can't both be right.

I always do them hot and running, and I'd never use any of the DEXRON fluids. They're fine for use in boxes designed to use them, but BW35/65/66's aren't.
 
#16
Hint:
Wipe the dipstick with a clean piece of paper kitchen towel to remove any discoloration to the metal occasioned by many years of immersion in a/t fluid. The risk of a "false negative" indication of worrying a/t fluid discolouration is thereby avoided.
 
#17
Hello harvey!

now, Bw 35 was removed and wil sent to an P6 guy, (see my posting for this case on the elctric section on this site. But, I am a little bit confused, because the plate on the BW 35 shows, colourcode = yellow, precode = 387. could 387 a NADA factory-fittment box? Is it a a Rover P6B box? I did not find anything about 387 on the web. could it be an BW65 box?

thank you
regards
Richard.
 

harveyp6

Well-Known Member
#18
I've seen BW35 "387" Series listed, but not in any genuine Rover publications, and until a few weeks ago, I'd never seen one, but chanced upon one for sale on ebay. I know that in general the higher the Series of the box the later it is, but I also know that the latest I've ever seen is the 303. As you say both have the yellow plate, which is another puzzle, as different Series have different colour plates. As it will be 40+ years old by now, dismantling it to see what's inside is no guarantee as it may have been apart in the meantime. I can only think of two possible explanations, 1) BW employed a Dyscalculic trainee to make up the plates for a short while, or 2) the boxes that came out of the factory that had 1-2 & 2-1 in the "2" position, as came to light recently with paperwork in a car Nick Dunning owned, were given their own series number, which would explain why they're not in any of the books. If that were the case "2" would be as above, and not SECOND gear only as it should be.
 
#19
harveyp6 said:
BW35 "387" , I can only think of two possible explanations, 1) BW employed a Dyscalculic trainee to make up the plates for a short while, or 2) the boxes that came out of the factory that had 1-2 & 2-1 in the "2" position, as came to light recently with paperwork in a car Nick Dunning owned, were given their own series number, which would explain why they're not in any of the books. If that were the case "2" would be as above, and not SECOND gear only as it should be.

thank you for quick response. indeed, very strange.
so, that means, If I drive POS 2 the Box can change the gear within POS 2 back to POS1, in the case of lower speed for example. WEll, I never noticed that. the only thing was, if I stopped because of a traffic light, it was possible to drive with POS 2 again after the lights went green. but I think, that is possible to all Auto-boxes (?)

I hope the technical inside of the 387 is the same / close to the common boxes like the known pre-code boxes. I orderd a good used spare BW35, precode 303, yellow plate. It should be no problem to fit the 303 into the NADA car?

:D Well, I hope it was not a dyscalculic trainee. otherwise, I have to drive in P position, park in R, and reverse with the 1 gear :D :D. An with the D drive, the car starts to dance.

regards, thank you
Richard
 
#20
harveyp6 said:
BW35 "387" , I can only think of two possible explanations, 1) BW employed a Dyscalculic trainee to make up the plates for a short while, or 2) the boxes that came out of the factory that had 1-2 & 2-1 in the "2" position, as came to light recently with paperwork in a car Nick Dunning owned, were given their own series number, which would explain why they're not in any of the books. If that were the case "2" would be as above, and not SECOND gear only as it should be.

thank you for quick response. indeed, very strange.
so, that means, If I drive POS 2 the Box can change the gear within POS 2 back to POS1, in the case of lower speed for example. WEll, I never noticed that. the only thing was, if I stopped because of a traffic light, it was possible to drive with POS 2 again after the lights went green. but I think, that is possible to all Auto-boxes (?)

I hope the technical inside of the 387 is the same / close to the common boxes like the known pre-code boxes. I orderd a good used spare BW35, precode 303, yellow plate. It should be no problem to fit the 303 into the NADA car?

:D Well, I hope it was not a dyscalculic trainee. otherwise, I have to drive in P position, park in R, and reverse with the 1 gear :D :D. An with the D drive, the car starts to dance.

regards, thank you
Richard
 
Top