before i do something unnecessary........

jp928

Well-Known Member
#21
Roll pin is very permanent, only viable if you know the angle to fit it EXACTLY, which is improbable. Thin superglue is very good at wicking into small gaps, and can be bought in small quantities - 3ml is common here.
 
#23
my own heater matrix which I desoldered and cleaned out. re-soldered as you can see at lower end on vice. tested and all well. no leaks but a job I would hesitate to do again as very fiddly and time consuming ( not soldering but getting box out and in) still have a small leak on system that is hard to find .. using Evans waterless coolant so I can't add any sealers such as Bars .. only the 'tablets 'sold in USA can be used but shipping costs etc put me off bothering. good luck to anybody whom has to work on heater box.
 

Mick Rae

Active Member
#24
Heater box back in. Much jiggling about, humming and hawing over the top flap lever and getting it through its hole, seemed impossible. Then after 30 mins of futile effort, it basically fell into place. New hoses on, throttle linkage on, wiper mullarky greased and all the steel dinitrolled. Then my eye caught site if a cold beer, so that's enough for today!
 

jp928

Well-Known Member
#26
My experience exactly - lots of jiggling etc, and then it falls intoplace when you least expect it. have fun getting the top vent control arm connected to the slide.
 

Mick Rae

Active Member
#27
well, I did not expect that to work but - those worn out splines on the heater lever: I tried a bit of the miracle that is Loctite 660 Liquid metal. I had this from another job (in the kitchen!) - its anaerobic cure so you can not worry about excess, its only between close surfaces it will go hard, hence I wasn't worried about it jamming the heater mechanism up. Left for 24 hours, wiped the uncured off, and the heater lever functions perfect - was sceptical as its the lever that opens the top flat and then has to shift another couple of clicks for the fan speeds, but its solid. Definitely a 'worth a try' substance it seems, but bloody expensive - still, thats two jobs its done now, and it wont go hard in the container, so a wee bit will last a long time.
 

Mick Rae

Active Member
#28
I am nearly there now. All reassembled, just got to fill up on coolant and pray there are no leaks from the new matrix o_O My low speed on the fan still doesn't work, oh well, I am living with that, I cannot be bothered to remove it all again (should have tested the motor when out, but was convinced the broken braided strap was to blame................... However, I still have not found the purpose of the earth lead on the actual fan control lever that I pictured above. I did wire it to earth to see if the low speed worked, it did not. The fan is clearly earthed as its working without this lead. So, can anyone tell me where that lead should connect to ie where is the earth point, or is it a bullet that I cannot see under the console? If it really is something I need to worry about, I guess I can always create a new earth point with a self tapper somewhere easier to reach, but if its not critical I don't want to go making a hole for nothing. If anyone knows the answer to this mysterious connection, I am all ears - it seems that once upon a time it may have been an unsheathed braided strap perhaps?
 

Mick Rae

Active Member
#30
Got it. Thanks. need to do a bit of squinting at the manual I reckon, as my heater has three wires as opposed to two from the fan motor. Maybe a change from S1 to S2. Hopefully be able to find where the lever earth should be connected to, though anywhere that's a decent and convenient spot will do I guess. Thanks again,
Mick
 

jp928

Well-Known Member
#31
well, I did not expect that to work but - those worn out splines on the heater lever: I tried a bit of the miracle that is Loctite 660 Liquid metal. I had this from another job (in the kitchen!) - its anaerobic cure so you can not worry about excess, its only between close surfaces it will go hard, hence I wasn't worried about it jamming the heater mechanism up. Left for 24 hours, wiped the uncured off, and the heater lever functions perfect - was sceptical as its the lever that opens the top flat and then has to shift another couple of clicks for the fan speeds, but its solid. Definitely a 'worth a try' substance it seems, but bloody expensive - still, thats two jobs its done now, and it wont go hard in the container, so a wee bit will last a long time.
It will eventually go thick, and in the end solid, UNLESS its kept in the fridge. I first saw this stuff in the 60s as Eastman 910, used by IBM techs, not available retail. Also...if you have a small gap such that it wont set, put a pinch of baking soda in the gap, smooth excess into a fillet with a finger, then drop a minimum amount of the glue on it. The powder will make it set quite quickly. Have been told gas given off here is cyanide, but dont quote me. The stuff is actually a cyano-acrylate. Have repaired a broken turn indicator stalk this way.
 

jp928

Well-Known Member
#32
Got it. Thanks. need to do a bit of squinting at the manual I reckon, as my heater has three wires as opposed to two from the fan motor. Maybe a change from S1 to S2. Hopefully be able to find where the lever earth should be connected to, though anywhere that's a decent and convenient spot will do I guess. Thanks again,
Mick
The three wires are power in (Br/gn) and grounds for the 2 speeds, one going straight for high speed, one going through the resistor for low speed.
 

quattro

Administrator
Staff member
#33
It will eventually go thick, and in the end solid, UNLESS its kept in the fridge. I first saw this stuff in the 60s as Eastman 910, used by IBM techs, not available retail. Also...if you have a small gap such that it wont set, put a pinch of baking soda in the gap, smooth excess into a fillet with a finger, then drop a minimum amount of the glue on it. The powder will make it set quite quickly. Have been told gas given off here is cyanide, but dont quote me. The stuff is actually a cyano-acrylate. Have repaired a broken turn indicator stalk this way.
660 is a methacrylate, not a cyanoacrylate. Cyanocrylates (superglues) are based on cyanoacrylic acid, hence the cyano bit, they do not give off cyanide but the fumes can be rather nasty.

Anaerobic methacrylates such as 660, and threadlocks etc cure in the absence of air and the presence of a reactive metal, which is why the bottles are always sold half full.

Cyanos cure in the absence of air and the presence of moisture.

Eastman Kodak developed Cyanos when looking for an adhesive to bond telescopic sites for rifles but it wasn't suitable due the whitening effect it had, but it did stick loads of things so they marketed it in America, later taken by Loctite and marketed in the UK as superglue.
 

Mick Rae

Active Member
#35
Job done - more or less!
Heater is very effective now. As good as any other heater, if not better, from cars of that era certainly. All linkages doing as they should, and really impressed by the temperature of the air - much, much better than before - imagine, a classic car that has a proper heater, well I never!
Was unable to find the earth connector for the fan switch, tried direct connecting to earth, still no half speed, so have given up on that - full speed works with the lever not connected to earth as it did previously, that will be a job for when the console is out I guess - don't think its doing any harm as is?
No leaks, bulkhead all rustproofed, engine bay cleaned up, fresh coolant and oil and filter, unless I have missed something major, I'm calling job a good un. And time to be driving again at last................what started as a post-Covid recovery boredom 'looksee' was a bit bigger than I thought, but have enjoyed every second of it, thanks in no small part to the advice received here. All other dash electrics functioning as they should, and he started up first turn of the key after all this time. Can hear the timing chain rattle a little bit, but I will turn up the radio until winter time for that.
Many thanks to you all, a beer awaits you should you be passing East Lothian one day. I'm off driving.
Mick
 

jp928

Well-Known Member
#36
Well done! Very satisfying to complete a job like this! Check the connections of the wires into the heater.....with 12V on the br/gn, try earthing each of the other 2 one at a timeand see what fan noise you get. Its possible the resistor has failed I guess.
 
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