Australian Camshaft questions.

Oldskoolrob

Active Member
#1
Hi cam guru's - I mentioned this in my 4.6 head thread but I thought I'd start a new cam-shaft related thread as most of the cams mentioned in other threads here are UK or USA based manufactures. I've got nothing against that but in this time of slow/unreliable freight I'm only looking at cams in stock in Australia.
These two cams have been recommended to me by my local Land Rover expert as they don't have any 3.5 or 3.9 cams in stock. The stage 2 has slightly more lift and duration on the exhaust.

Cam1: CAMSHAFT ROVER V8 (STG 1) DUR@050 204/204 V/LIFT 450/450

Cam2: CAMSHAFT ROVER V8 (STG 2) DUR@050 204/214 V/LIFT 450/474

I spoke to the manufacturer on a Friday afternoon and he said they're basically the same - I think he had had a long week lol.
Can anyone here tell me what effect the slight difference in exhaust specs would translate to in the real world? Any other Aussie cam recommendations?

Muchly appreciated.

PARts B2v4

PARts B2v4

Ohh - looks like a place in NSW still has standard cams. If I have standard valve-springs is it just safer to stick with a standard 3.9 cam into the 3.5?
Camshaft Rover V8 3.5 & 3.9 ETC6850L
 
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quattro

Administrator
Staff member
#2
There are many different cams available for the Rover V8 and they are designed to suit the many different specs of the engine. If you're rebuilding your two tonne Rangey which you use to pull redwood stumps out with, you don't want to fit a cam suited to a TVR.

I believe the ETC6850 was designed for a Land Rover so it will work in your engine but is not ideally suited to it.

You need to work out what you want from your engine then ensure the cam you fit suits that.
 

jp928

Well-Known Member
#4
My only experience with a 3.9 was in a late 90s Disco - 9.35:1 CR. Pulled and revved very nicely, big change from the previous 3.5 Disco. Both were 5 speeds. Previously had an 8.13:1 CR RR 3.5 in Oz - ecellent low down torque, but poor in the revving department - leads me to think that the CR is the important factor. All I have read says that a 3.9 Cam in a 3.5 is a good upgrade - some have said that they are almost identical, except the 3.9 timing is advanced a few degrees. Since the specs of cam timing these days have changed from absolute open/close degrees to timing from either 1mm or 0.050" valve lift , its difficult to compare timing specs.
 

SydneyRoverP6B

Well-Known Member
Staff member
#5
My understanding is for an automatic transmission, a camshaft with a duration of 265 degrees or so and a valve lift ideally not over 0.39" would be ideal. You don't need a stage 1 for a road going car with an automatic transmission, as the rev range where you would normally drive will not be matched by the camshaft characteristics. A standard pre pollution camshaft for a 3.9 would be the ideal offering, if buying a genuine item.

As an example of what can be required when deviating from standard, the Australian made Crow camshaft for the Rover v8.
37776 - ROVER V8. REPLACES 37666 - 37776 - ROVER V8. RE : CrowCams

Ron.
 

PeterZRH

Well-Known Member
#6
A P6 is a full tonne lighter than a Land Rover Discovery and quite low geared so even with an auto worrying about torque isn't really going to be an issue unless you specify something for a TVR or the track. It'll take something quite radical to fundamentally alter the characteristics of this engine which is perfectly adequate low down.

Stage 1 cams work fine and are popular with Land Rover owners. I have this one with an automatic (they call it "level 2" - level 1 being standard) - Crower 50229 and it works great. Idles smoothly at 600rpm. Duration 258/260, Lift .430/.446 in. It's with free flow filters and big valve heads (same type as you). Colin Gould's people measured 118bhp at the wheels (95ish for a standard 10.5:1 auto) but there was a fair bit more there but it kept kicking down. So expect around +30% from such a setup (measured at the wheels).

I would take your good engine and fit 9.75 pistons (Vitesse spec), use my cam or a similar one along with the "Montego air filter trick". You really do feel an extra 30% at the wheels and it feels about as fast as the standard chassis wants to go.
 
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Oldskoolrob

Active Member
#7
A P6 is a full tonne lighter than a Land Rover Discovery and quite low geared so even with an auto worrying about torque isn't really going to be an issue unless you specify something for a TVR or the track.
And this engine will be in a Mk2 Cortina (about 950kg), with 4.1 gears (I'll eventually go taller, but that's a story for another time) :)
 

Oldskoolrob

Active Member
#9
My understanding is for an automatic transmission, a camshaft with a duration of 265 degrees or so and a valve lift ideally not over 0.39" would be ideal. You don't need a stage 1 for a road going car with an automatic transmission, as the rev range where you would normally drive will not be matched by the camshaft characteristics. A standard pre pollution camshaft for a 3.9 would be the ideal offering, if buying a genuine item.

As an example of what can be required when deviating from standard, the Australian made Crow camshaft for the Rover v8.
37776 - ROVER V8. REPLACES 37666 - 37776 - ROVER V8. RE : CrowCams

Ron.
FWIW that Crow cam is nearly identical to the Dynotech 217D, (which is the second cam I mentioned) and they refer to it as a 'stage 2' in their catalogue. When you say 'genuine' do you mean as a stock item or have there been dramas with non-genuine cams?
 

SydneyRoverP6B

Well-Known Member
Staff member
#14
FWIW that Crow cam is nearly identical to the Dynotech 217D, (which is the second cam I mentioned) and they refer to it as a 'stage 2' in their catalogue. When you say 'genuine' do you mean as a stock item or have there been dramas with non-genuine cams?
Yes, genuine as in an original Rover (Land Rover) item. Unless you're prepared to change the rocker geometry to accommodate a camshaft with a higher lift, then standard is by far the best option. I am not trying to take the fun out of it, but the Rover V8 in road going form is not a high revving engine. Maximum torque is delivered at circa 2700rpm, so I would be inclined to suggest a camshaft that provides a boost from essentially just off idle to say 3500rpm. Then your car will be fun to drive and not slow in picking up when you plant your foot.

Ron.
 

PeterZRH

Well-Known Member
#15
I's say you need to find a taller axle and fit larger tyres if this is going to work! I don't know if the RS2000 fits but that's 3.54:1 which is the same as the P6 2000 4-pot but likely smaller tyres. Oh, and I'm guessing an LSD might be helpful.
 
#16
Had a look under the car and it's a 3.89:1, so that's marginally better. I agree, it will need to go on the list of eventually stuff to do!
 
#17
Yes, genuine as in an original Rover (Land Rover) item. Unless you're prepared to change the rocker geometry to accommodate a camshaft with a higher lift, then standard is by far the best option. I am not trying to take the fun out of it, but the Rover V8 in road going form is not a high revving engine. Maximum torque is delivered at circa 2700rpm, so I would be inclined to suggest a camshaft that provides a boost from essentially just off idle to say 3500rpm. Then your car will be fun to drive and not slow in picking up when you plant your foot.

Ron.
I'm thinking you're right.
 
#18
The standard Rover cams have the overlap reduced as they head toward 2000 (date). the tor engine is very small overlap. I've run a stage 2 cam (Aussie heatseeker) and standard carb needles and the car is very quick. It still bogged down off the line though as it needed the revs to be over 2000. I fixed that by going to the lower 3.54 : 1 diff. If I'm not mistaken the Aussie cortinas used standard borg warner diffs and back axles; shared with Chrylsers and Leylands of the day.
 
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